Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

When open source theory meets fact

Filed under
OSS

Open source theory and fact walked hand in hand this week. Pundits and prognosticators all came calling with their own miscellaneous and sundry opinions about how this whole open source thing works and what it really means.

Leading the pundits and prognosticators was industry giant Gartner Group. The Gartner Application Development Summit in the US brought some tasty tidbits to light.

The Academics jumped in this week as well and things got even more theoretical than usual, as the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School argued for the implementation of open standards in order to foster the growth of ICT worldwide.

Also in the theory department came an interesting piece from the Guardian & Mail, wherein the author wrestled with the issue of whether the dissemination of open source ideals has the capacity to truly revolutionise business, or whether the impacts will be rather more limited.

On a less theoretical (or not) front, the Novell PR machine swung into the wind last week and fired the first volley in a broadside of publicity announcing the coming release of SuSE Linux 10.

One of the other interesting (and possible apocryphal) stats included in the coverage over at Yahoo! is that the OpenSuSE project has been wildly successful to the tune of a copy being downloaded every 18 seconds.

For quote of the week, I'd like to nominate John Roberts, chief executive and co-founder of SugarCRM. In an article in the San Jose Mercury, he's quoted discussing how open source is impacting business models.

ComputerWorld is running a charming little piece on the 10 Things You Need to Tell Your Lawyer About Open Source.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Can Open-Source 3D Printing Make Custom Prostheses Affordable?

One exciting thing about 3D-printed prostheses is that the designs are all freely available open source and constantly evolving. Holmes-Siedle is particularly interested in tensioning, and the fishing wire that acts as tendons in the prosthetic hands. He made some changes to the basic design of Joe’s hand and within minutes of sharing his new designs online, other volunteers around the world were printing, testing and giving feedback on the adjustment. He’s now working on a new revision based on what he’s learned. Read more

Using Raspberry Pi to get teens involved in open source

At the end of last month, I had the unique opportunity to participate with a few of my work colleagues on the US2020 RTP STEM EXPO. About 500 students from North Carolina interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) showed up to the event. My colleagues and I gathered around a couple of tables and chatted with students, teachers, administrators, and parents about open source, open hardware, and programming. Read more

Jolla Pushes BRICS Partnerships To Target Android In Emerging Markets

Finnish mobile upstart Jolla, whose linux-based Sailfish OS is marketed as a more flexible alternative to the dominant platforms of Android and iOS, is stepping up its push to win friends and influence mobile users in the BRICS cluster of emerging markets — ahead of the release of Sailfish 2.0 this summer, which will be the first version of its OS that OEMs can license. Read more

What Are The Chances for an Ubuntu IPO?

At the recent OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Mark Shuttleworth announced that he was debating an initial public offering for Canonical Software, Ubuntu's commercial division. The news was interpreted as a sign of success in many circles, but whether making Canonical a public company would be a wise move seems doubtful at best. As reported by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, Canonical has been considering the idea for several months, but has not yet made a definite decision. Yet the idea has been raised because of the success of Canonical's OpenStack consulting division, which has apparently become the first Canonical venture to become profitable, and includes partnerships with Microsoft and VMWare. "We now have a story that the market will understand," Shuttleworth is reported as saying. Read more