Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Case for Linux in the Classroom

Filed under
Linux

A lot of people tend to shy away at the mention of even the word Linux, myself included. Being raised on a Windows machine, and pampered by an easy visual interface, I was nervous about trying out something that used so much of the command line. I like clicking, scrolling, and buttons that flash. Using a command line made me nervous. The one thing that didn’t make me nervous though, was the price tag(free). With the mindset of being technology savvy, and having nothing to lose, I decided to give it a whirl. Since then I have not only been opened up to a very good operating system, but have learned that maybe it wouldn’t be such a bad option for the education community.

It’s free folks. Windows and OSX cost money. For every machine you have in a school you are charged a certain amount for it to run an operating system like Windows or OSX. Not Linux. The whole idea surrounding the Linux movement is “Free”. It means that you are free to use it, free to change it to suit your needs, free to do with it what you please. This in itself could save schools a lot of money. Not to mention that the majority of software is free as well.

Linux is the only OS designed and equipped with Education in mind. Edubuntu, a flavor of Linux, is designed with the classroom in mind. It comes preinstalled with education software and applications that suit students of all grade levels, and even has some handy applications for the teacher too.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Ready to give Linux a try? These are the 5 distros you need to consider

There are so many Linux distributions that choosing one can be overwhelming for a new user. One might be too intimidating for a user to even try, while another might be too simplified, blocking that user from knowing how Linux systems actually function. I have been using Linux as my primary OS since 2005 and have tried all major (and quite a lot of minor) distributions. I have learned that not every distribution is for everyone. Since I also assist people in migrating to Linux, I have chosen the 5 distros that I recommend to new users based on their level of comfort and desire to learn (or not learn) more about Linux. Read more

Review of the new Firefox browser built for developers

Mozilla recently announced a new browser version for developers on the 10th anniversary of the Firefox browser. The Usersnap team and I took a look at whether it works well for the web development process, offers developers a variety of possible applications, and if it keeps up with the Google Chrome dev tools. Read more

Mapping the world with open source

In the world of geospatial technology, closed source solutions have been the norm for decades. But the tides are slowly turning as open source GIS software is gaining increasing prominence. Paul Ramsey, senior strategist at the open source company Boundless, is one of the people trying to change that. Ramsey has been working with geospatial software for over ten years, as programmer and consultant. He founded the PostGIS spatial database project in 2001, and is currently an active developer and member of the project steering committee. Ramsey serves as an evangelist for OpenGeo Suite, works with the Boundless business development team to share about their collection of offerigns, and speaks and teaches regularly at conferences around the world. Read more

4MLinux Game Edition Lets You Play Natively Games like Doom or Hexen

4MLinux Game Edition, a Linux distribution based on Busybox, Dropbear, OpenSSH, and PuTTY that also incorporates numerous games, has been promoted to version 10.1 Beta. Read more