Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A day at the Opera

Filed under

I hate Opera. I really do. And I hate it even more because, unlike Internet Explorer, or Konqueror, I want to like it. When I install the Windows or KDE browser, I spend two minutes with it, go “YUERGH” and flee back to Firefox as fast as I can. With Opera, I want to make it work, and I just can’t. It’s maddening: I know there’s a very good piece of software there, and it seems like the developers want to make it absolutely impossible for me to enjoy it. I tried a few times to make Opera my default browser, and every time I spend hours tweaking and configuring things, and even longer hours searching the web how things should be configured or tweaked. And then I just give up.

Today was no different. Opera 9.5 is out, and I though, “what the heck. Let’s do this again. Maybe today will be different.” It wasn’t. Opera is still the Darth Vader in browserworld: there’s much good in it. I can feel it. But it’s maddeningly frustrating trying to get it out, and I could get killed while doing it. Well, maybe not killed, but it sure feels like it some time.

Look and feel


In the four-ring circus that is the current browser market, each of the major vendors is doing their best to amaze users with new features and new releases. Today it's Norway-based Opera Software's turn under the big top with its latest browser release, Opera 9.5.

The Opera 9.5 release, which comes two years after its 9.0 predecessor, has a new look and adds security, search and synchronization features, which are freely available to Windows, Mac and Linux users. The latest release comes as Mozilla gears up for its Firefox 3 release next week, and Microsoft's Internet Explorer 8 is looming on the horizon.

So what sets Opera apart?

Non-free software

I totally understand that this site is about Linux, not the GPL. Let it just be clear that Opera is proprietary; And it's not helpful to some.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Announced at LinuxCon Europe 2015

A Few Worrisome Regressions Appear In Ubuntu 15.04 vs. 15.10 Performance

With Ubuntu 15.10 set to be released later this month, I've started preparing for a variety of Linux performance comparisons involving the Wily Werewolf. This morning I ran some Ubuntu 15.04 vs. 15.10 benchmarks on one of my frequent test beds and it's revealed a few significant changes in some of the benchmarks. Read more

Leftovers: KDE

  • Baloo 5.15
    We have a new release of Baloo. For those of you who don't know about it - It's a file indexing and searching solution for Linux. It's quite fast, and shipped by default in KDE Plasma.
  • October Development News: krita moves to a new repository
    Lots of things are happening! Let’s start with the most important part: Krita is no longer part of the Calligra source code. Krita 2.9 will still be developed inside Calligra, and we expect to do several more releases of Krita 2.9 with bug fixes and performance improvements. In fact, we expect to be releasing Krita 2.9 regularly until Krita 3.0 is done.
  • The Kubuntu Podcast Team Debunks some Myths
    Aaron Honeycutt, Ovidiu-Florin BOGDAN, and Rick Timmis debunk the myths surrounding the future of Kubuntu and interview Eike Hein (KDE Developer).
  • KDE Frameworks 5.15 have landed in Kubuntu Wily
    KDE Frameworks 5.15 have landed in Kubuntu Wily (to become 15.10).