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A day at the Opera

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Software

I hate Opera. I really do. And I hate it even more because, unlike Internet Explorer, or Konqueror, I want to like it. When I install the Windows or KDE browser, I spend two minutes with it, go “YUERGH” and flee back to Firefox as fast as I can. With Opera, I want to make it work, and I just can’t. It’s maddening: I know there’s a very good piece of software there, and it seems like the developers want to make it absolutely impossible for me to enjoy it. I tried a few times to make Opera my default browser, and every time I spend hours tweaking and configuring things, and even longer hours searching the web how things should be configured or tweaked. And then I just give up.

Today was no different. Opera 9.5 is out, and I though, “what the heck. Let’s do this again. Maybe today will be different.” It wasn’t. Opera is still the Darth Vader in browserworld: there’s much good in it. I can feel it. But it’s maddeningly frustrating trying to get it out, and I could get killed while doing it. Well, maybe not killed, but it sure feels like it some time.

Look and feel




Also:

In the four-ring circus that is the current browser market, each of the major vendors is doing their best to amaze users with new features and new releases. Today it's Norway-based Opera Software's turn under the big top with its latest browser release, Opera 9.5.

The Opera 9.5 release, which comes two years after its 9.0 predecessor, has a new look and adds security, search and synchronization features, which are freely available to Windows, Mac and Linux users. The latest release comes as Mozilla gears up for its Firefox 3 release next week, and Microsoft's Internet Explorer 8 is looming on the horizon.

So what sets Opera apart?

Non-free software

I totally understand that this site is about Linux, not the GPL. Let it just be clear that Opera is proprietary; And it's not helpful to some.

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