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Red Hat settles 2 patent lawsuits filed against it

Filed under
Linux
Legal

Business software maker Red Hat Inc said on Wednesday that it has settled two of three pending patent lawsuits that the company has been fighting.

Red Hat, the world's biggest seller of Linux software, said it has settled patent claims by Firestar Software Inc, filed in 2006, and DataTern Inc, filed this year.

Financial terms of the settlements were not disclosed.

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Red Hat Puts Patent Issue to Rest

press.redhat.com: Today Red Hat announced the settlement of patent litigation involving Firestar Software, Inc. and DataTern, Inc. Below is a detailed FAQ with additional information about today’s news.

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Red Hat demonstrates the open-source way to quash patent lawsuit

Software vendors of the world, take note: Red Hat has just demonstrated a truly open-source friendly way to tackle patent lawsuits. In settling a patent lawsuit with DataTern and Amphion Innovations PLC, Red Hat protected its short-term interests in the JBoss software. But it also went much further.

Unlike other patent deals (Read: Every single one that Microsoft has signed), which try to create a walled garden of protection for the signing parties, Red Hat opted to go much broader.

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