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PCLinuxOS Moderation

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PCLOS
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It seems that PClinuxOS is getting slammed for the moderation by one or more mods. I feel that I need to put forth a view on this topic.

The forums for the most part are friendly and helpful. I must admit the feeling on the forum was quite different when there were only 2800 of us using it but it has grown significantly in the past few years and the feel of the forum has changed.

It is not only the feeling that has changed but so have the main people that use to be on the forum. It is the people that make the forum and some of the more helpful ones have left.

The moderation on the forum is fair, if you stay within the rules put out by the forum there will be no moderation done on you as a poster. In saying that, when some do step over the rules and break them, most of the mods are very polite and professional.

In saying that, PCLinuxOS Forums, like others have moderators that don’t seem to notice that their comments can be abrasive and that the user of the forum is also the ones being asked to donate to the cause.

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Article

Hmmmm...

"The authors have deleted this blog. The content is no longer available."

re: Article

No great loss.

Just another whine-fest about pissy users or pissy moderators or some other thin skinned BS (the article waffled so much - it was hard to tell what the exact point was). At least if you're going to bitch about something - man up and name names.

It's hard to understand (from the Scientist/Engineer POV) how a lot of these so called "tech" forums turn into one big circular back patting conventions - where if the "warm-n-fuzzy" meter isn't turned to "9" or better - you can expect a phone call from one of the regular members (or worse yet, their mom!).

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