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2008 Fav Desktop

KDE
46% (698 votes)
GNOME
39% (588 votes)
XFCE
6% (87 votes)
Enlightenment
3% (43 votes)
*box
4% (53 votes)
other
2% (33 votes)
Total votes: 1502

What so horrible about KDE 4

What so horrible about KDE 4 ?
And what about KDE >= 4.1 ?

KDE 4 = horrible KDE 3 =

KDE 4 = horrible
KDE 3 = good
Gnome = I guess I will have no choice in the future since everyone is moving to KDE 4
KDE 5 = hope is better

Walked away from KDE

Switched over to Gnome 2.22 with Arch Linux. Never going back to KDE.

Kevin Miller, Jr.
Managing Director
VscapeOne - Vietnam
http://www.vscapeone.com
http://www.saigonlinux.com

Vietnam Professional Linux/Unix Group
http://www.saigonlinux.org

Mandriva 2008.1

That's me latest love. With KDE. Looking forward to 4.1.

Debian Lenny with KDE 3.5.9

I Agree with you! Smile

Debian Lenny with KDE 3.5.9

Debian Lenny with KDE 3.5.9 here. I'm enchanted to see such a stable KDE, and Lenny isn't even in version freeze stage.

PCLinuxOS GNOME is my main distro

I selected GNOME as my favorite desktop because it is the one I use the most on my boxes, but this is merely a personal choice. To me, GNOME is easier on the eyes during a long tweak session than KDE is. I have no qualms with firing up some KDE 3.5.9 for a change of pace, however. While it still has a ways to go, I lift my glass of Guinness to the developers of KDE4 for having the cojones to blaze a new trail for the Linux Desktop, and I wish them much success. On the other hand, it will be wise for the KDE camp to also have a good crew of devs continuing to build on the solidness of good old KDE3 for those who prefer the traditional desktop or have machines that are not nearly as robust as their main Hack Rocket at their main station Smile

I also have a fond place in my heart for the Mouse (XFCE) and the various *boxes because they keep the Dinoputers happily going strong and out of the landfill. These lightweight Window Managers are also nice for Server N00bs who are learning how to set up servers, but want a light GUI to fall back on while they are learning the nuances of Ye Olde Command Line.

That said, my personal favorite is good ol' GNOME, and especially PCLinuxOS GNOME for its quality packages and a solid workability out of the box. It is also easy to learn for those who are sick of Dreadmond's FUD and are ready to try something other than Shista (because it's Crap!). Bottom line: Try various flavors of desktop and window managers and see which one floats your boat the best...

But, that is just my two cents worth...

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