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The Tinkering of Brazil

Eoin Brazil, a Computer Systems graduate from the University of Limerick (BSc in 2000 and MSc in 2003), is now a Research Officer working on auditory displays and on the use of sound in human-computer interaction in the university's Interaction Design Centre.

His research interests cover Computer Science, Interaction Design, Electronics, Sound, and Multimedia. He is an Irish Delegate to the European COST Action IC0601 on Sonic Interaction Design and is finishing his doctoral research in this area.

At Irish Open Source Technology Conference, he will explain why 'The Arduino' platform is an ideal learning environment for those new to electronics, such as artists or designer, wishing to learn and create hardware projects, whilst at the same time still offers so much to experienced software programmers wishing to use this approach to develop their own projects.

'The Arduino' is a fully open source and extendable programming environment (IDE) running on cross-platforms - Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It simplifies many of the previous difficulties encountered with programming microcontrollers.

Eoin believes open source has vastly reduced the cost and complexity of and has brought the programming of microcontrollers out of the hands of electronic or computer engineers and into the hands of electronic amateurs who wish to hack and tinker. Costing about $50 Arduino, certainly is very cheap.

Talking at the announcement of his IOTC engagement, Brazil continues "I want to introduce the audience to the possibilities and functionality of the Arduino and I hope by the end of my talk people will have the knowledge and basics to start to develop their own homebrew ideas using this cheap open source platform."

Barry Alistair, MD of IrishDev.com and chair of the Irish Open Source Technology Conference said "Whilst the government's strategy for transforming Ireland to a knowledge economy is crucial to the country, the visibility of these projects is also paramount in encouraging second level students to choose the industry for their careers. It will be interesting to see how open source is impacting research projects, and since the University of Limerick is the birth place of IrishDev.com, it is particularly special to have Eoin join us to share his work."

Readers might be interested to know that the IOTC is going to be streamed live on the IOTC Website on the 19th and 20th of June - keep abreast via RSS follow us on Twitter.com/IOTC2008, Facebook or please send an event alert request to IOTC2008@IrishDev.com and we'll be happy to send a reminder, weekly updates and even chances to win complimentary tickets.

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