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Linux Desktop - An Analyst's Nightmare

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Linux

People who have mastered the craft of writing, don't necessarily qualify as expert analysts. I know few who can write and analyze an operating system. I know few people who can analyze an operating system and carry a conversation with another human being. Have you ever heard a writer say, "I'm not technical?" How about a technician say, "I'm not good with people?"

Linux desktops give many analysts problems because it's their worst nightmare. To do the system justice they would have to admit that they don't really know what they're doing in the first place. If you cannot figure out Linux, you have no place pontificating about information technology.

Good analysts usually have excellent written and verbal communication skills. They socialize easily and can politic with the best. They generally make lousy technicians.

So, they hire others to do the job. What do they look for in junior technical analysts? They look for communication skills and someone who can explain things to them. So, when a young man or woman comes into a meeting and throws around the latest buzz words from the technical farm, suddenly a top analyst puts his or her trust on the shoulders of the next fool.

Last week, one of the Linux luminaries discussed media bias against Linux and took some heat for it. I read one of the media target's responses and wanted to write him. I just couldn't think of a diplomatic way to engage him in an interaction that would make a difference.

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