Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How open source is losing the charity battle

Filed under
OSS

Non-profit organisations are keen to take advantage of emerging technologies such as social networking for fund-raising and software as a service for administration, but a lack of perceived support options is keeping them away from open source software solutions and firmly focused on more traditional commercial providers such as Microsoft.

At this week's Connecting Up conference in Brisbane, staff from non-profit groups were eagerly discussing Web 2.0 technologies, how wikis could help their organisation, and the role which Twitter might play in their fund-raising plans.

"We in Australia have barely scratched the surface of Web 2.0," said Doug Jacquier, CEO of CISA (Community Information Strategies Australia), which organised the event. "If we don't move soon, we risk losing an entire generation of potential supporters and donors."

While next generation technologies may be appealing, for resource-strapped charities, government service delivery branches and non-government organisations (NGOs), merely getting existing IT to work can be an uphill battle.

Moving beyond that is both pricey and scary




Stories in the UK...

Microsoft does a lot of dumping in this area and later tries to 'pull' when they get locked in. There were such stories in the UK.

re: Charity

Yes, it's oh so terrible when big companies like Microsoft and Cisco donate or make HUGE discounts on their products to help charities operate a modern, viable, and secure IT shop.

What are these charities thinking of - I mean besides operating on a shoe string budget and getting the most bang for their buck and not wasting the time of their primary work force by making them learn new technology.

Somehow I doubt if Vauxhall was handing out 50 Euro Astra's to UK nonprofits, Schestowitz would have his knickers in a knot.

Register Article

You ought see see the recent Reg article about MS cutting the charities' air supply to milk for cash. Ugly, ugly, ugly. Here in the UK...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

FPGA-enabled vision system uses USB3 cams, runs Linux

NI unveiled a fanless, rugged vision computer that runs NI Linux on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers an FPGA and support for 350MB/s USB3 Vision cameras. National Instruments (NI) has delivered its NI Linux Real-Time OS on a variety of embedded industrial computers and control systems, including its recent CompactRIO 4-slot Performance Controller. Now, the company is applying NI Linux to machine vision with its new USB3 Vision compatible NI CVS-1459RT. Read more

Fedora Might Try A New Scheduling Strategy For Its Releases

It's no secret that Fedora has had a challenging time sticking to their release schedules for a long time. With taking care of blocker bugs, Fedora Linux releases tend to frequently slip -- with Fedora 21 it's about two months behind schedule and we're just past the alpha stage. By the time Fedora 21 actually ships, Fedora 20 will have been at least twelve months old. However, a new release scheduling strategy might be tried starting with Fedora 22. Read more

Debian Jessie Might Get Rid Of The kFreeBSD Port

For years there's been the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD port that ships the same Debian GNU user-land as Debian GNU/Linux but replaces the Linux kernel with that of the FreeBSD kernel. Read more

Small firms and open-source software put Spine back into NHS after IT fiasco

Without the fuss and delays that have plagued so many large government IT projects, a key part of the NHS digital infrastructure was recently migrated and updated in a single weekend. The collection of applications and directory services known as the Spine connects clinicians, patients and local services to core NHS services such as the GP2GP patient record transfer, the Electronic Prescription Service, patients' Summary Care Records, and the Choose and Book service. More than 250,000 health service staff connect to it every day, sending more than 400m messages each month. Read more