Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Lesson in Encryption

Filed under
HowTos

One of the qualities that distinguishes Linux from lesser operating systems is its superior support for your privacy and security. That means more than avoiding buggy virus-propagating applications, such as Microsoft's Outlook and Internet Explorer. Savvy people and organizations quite rightly want to protect their data files and e-mail from snooping eyes. One way to do so is by keeping important files in coded form, a practice known as encryption.

Don't think encryption is only for secret agents or computer gurus with ponytails down to the waist and witty t-shirts from thinkgeek.com. Putting an ordinary file on a PC is like leaving a letter face up on a desk. It's in plain view for anyone who passes by. Encryption is practical for ordinary people who want to keep their data private when they put it on a PC. It effectively puts that letter into a strong sealed envelope. You can do it, and it's an important ability to have.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Pro tip: Find tons of open-source Android software with F-Droid

If you're looking for truly open-source software for the Android platform, you don't have to do a ton of searching or check through licenses from within the Google Play Store. All you have to do is download a simple tool called F-Droid. With this tool, you can download and install apps (from quite a large listing) as easily as you can from the Google Play Store. You won't, however, find F-Droid in the Google Play Store. Instead, you have to download the .apk file and install it manually. Once it's installed, the rest is just a matter of searching for an app and tapping to install. Read more