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OLPC: following in the steps of Microsoft

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OLPC

When Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of the One Laptop Per Child project, said two months ago that the project needed to be managed "more like Microsoft" he was speaking nothing but the truth.

The OLPC was set up, initially, to provide laptops as educational tools to children in developing countries. But the shine has all gone from the project now, due to poor take-up, an unseemly row with Intel and infighting that has led to top people quitting. There is also a patent infringement lawsuit over the keyboard.

Add to that the deviation from running free software to becoming a repository for Windows XP (and all the scumware, spyware and malware that live on that venerable operating system) and Negroponte's halo has all but gone.

When Microsoft's new operating system Vista turned out to be a spectacular failure, the company tried to turn people's attention to its next operating system, Windows 7. It's still spinning that tale.

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