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The Much Improved Hardy Heron

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Ubuntu

Canonical has made my birthday for the second year running. Today I received my Hardy Heron CD! I have read a lot about Hardy since it's beta was out and I was dying to try it out, so the CD was really a pleasant surprise.

I had migrated back to Windows XP for better blogging. But this CD made me forget everything and I just wanted to get Ubuntu back on my computer.Thankfully, the Hardy Heron Live CD includes the Wubi installer, with which you can install Ubuntu right within Windows (and uninstall it whenever you want). I went for it and Hardy was up and running within half an hour. A quick glance made it clear than Hardy is indeed a great improvement over Feisty (I haven't tried Gutsy). Three hours hence, I have already explored quite a bit of the newest Ubuntu. I have plans start my own "Ubuntu for Beginners" tips in near future; till then here's a quick "what's-great-and-what's-not" in Hardy Heron.

The Improvements

1.The UI has been greatly refined. Window borders are smoother, there are better inbuilt themes available (Human-Murrine especially) and desktop effects are present by default. Icons are sexier and there are better screen resolution options as well.

2.I am on Firefox 3! I have had trouble with beta products in the past, and that kept me from trying the betas of Firefox 3 in Windows. But this browser is inbuilt in Hardy and works without a glitch! Firefox 3 is easily much better than 2, which is what I still have in Windows.

3....

Things that could have been better...




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