Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

Filed under
Reviews

I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

My first hurdle was getting into gnome. I usually start kde with a startx referencing my ~/.xinitrc file with the entry of the latest startkde. So, I exited kde, loaded the new nvidia drivers, and preceded to scratch my head. I which'd for a startgnome binary...hmmm, no luck. I locate'd a gnomestart, again, the big nothing. Then I remembered gnome comes with a graphical login thing kinda like kdm, so I typed gdm as root. Ahhh, there we go. I chose gnome as the session and logged in.

I preceded to look around in the menus and start customizing a tad. I set a wallpaper and customized my terminal. After the two most important details finished, I could now see some of the included applications.

Well, seems gnome comes with some nice games to waste time when I should be working. There are a few applications for using the internet such as gaim, nmap, and evolution. Setting up evolution was a breeze, it comes with a nice little wizard. There's nvu in the menu for web development. What is the configuration editor? There's a system monitor, screensaver configuration and a file browser. Yikes! All stuff I left on kde desktop popped up as soon as I opened the file manager. I wasn't expecting that. What an embarrassingly messy desktop. Well, I'da cleaned up if I'da known I was gonna have company. The multimedia menu is a little sparse and the cd player crashed as soon as it was opened. Hey, a theme manager, alriiight. Now that's better. Also included are some other tweaking applications such as screen resolution config, sessions manager, and sound server config.

All in all this seems like a desktop environment/window manager I could use. I like fluxbox quite a bit and gnome seems like it's a little easier to customize in that there are some graphical configurations available. It seems extremely snappy and responsive. Gnome has certainly made great strides since my last look around and I know I'll be coming back to it from time to time. If you are gnome fan, I imagine you'll appreciate the improvements such as a much ligher and more responsive feel in general. The default fonts are gorgeous and the included themes are nice.

This is just a beta ebuild from gentoo, so the few crashes I experienced may or may not be attributed to gnome exclusively. The main applications seem stable and responsive.

If you haven't explored gnome in a while or have never given it a look-see, it might be worth your while to log in. I'm glad I installed and looked around. I bet I'll be back.

Oh and of course, screenshots.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

Today in Techrights