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Sending Windows back to Hell

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Mac

Last week I became so fed up with Microsoft, Windows and the ridiculous cost of SQL server that I went out and bought a 12-inch Powerbook, something I should have done a long time ago. This leaves me using no Windows machines, not even my dual-boot Thinkpad.

Despite being an open source advocate I find myself forced into using certain Microsoft applications, which feels very hypocritical but sadly necessary at least until there is a true replacement for Excel. The Powerbook is great, nice form factor, though it runs a bit hot. But what I really want is a Thinkpad that runs OSX natively, which I think should be possible with the new Intel chips. So, I hereby begin my campaign appealing to Lenovo to make this happen. All we need is an Apple key on the keyboard-I'd even use CTRL or ALT if I had to. Anything to make the drama of Windows and Outlook go away.

Full Story.

Apparently

Apparently anyone can write about anything these days at InfoWorld.

Remember when InfoWorld was a "must read" trade journal instead of the pedestrian rag it is today?

As this article demonstrates, any childish rant, assuming it has enough buzz words to seem "techie" can be called a article.

How the editors let some beef about MSSQL Server pricing turn into a "I hate windows" rant is beyond me (and exactly what does one have to do with the other?). I've read it twice, and still can't tell what the purpose of the article is. It's not even a good rant with it's meandering topic thread.

What ever happened to "good journalism", you know the who, what, why, where, and when type reporting - instead of "I'm a cheap whiny bastard and here's what's pissing me off this morning" we seem to be stuck with.

Maybe InfoWorld should think about keeping their engineers in house and outsource their reporter positions to China. It certainly couldn't get any worse.

re: apparently

Yeah, I know what you mean. I try not to link to blogs too often, but who could resist the title? Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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