Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 5: No Help For The Helpless

Filed under
Linux

In "Does Microsoft impose a prisoner mentality?", I speculated that years of using Windows seems to do something to people. Something kind of creepy. It seems as if it steals their intelligence, or their will to learn, or... something. At the end of the second part, after I took one commenter's questions and made a case study from it, I closed by saying, "Beyond freeing our software and our media, it will be useless unless we have free minds to go with it."

A lot of commenters wrote in to agree with those posts. Even some Windows users stepped forward and said, yes, they did feel that Windows had given them a prisoner complex, where they got into Linux and were absolutely paralyzed - at the freedom! And here again, I will point out: normally Linux geeks are thinking in terms of the computer. Explain the process to the subject; subject's problem solved. But they aren't looking through the monitor at the person's face.

In many cases, the person is scared. And fear is an emotion! Not something you can cure with a man page or simply answering a technical question. This is a human issue, not a computer issue. And right about this time I get the interface astronauts (thanks, Joel!) who start shooting off their big bazoo about how we need to change the interface to be just like Windows and throw away the command line and the compiler and the source code and the license and - oh the hell with it, just toss Linux in the dumpster while you're at it.

But that doesn't make any difference because these Windows users are just as scared of Windows and Apple as they are of Linux! They just happened to find Windows first and clung to it.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Is your company an open source parasite?

Getting involved in the open source projects that matter to a company, in other words, gives them more ability to influence their future today, even as dependence on a vendor results in putting one's future in the hands of that vendor to resolve on their timetable. It's simply not smart business, not if an open source alternative exists and your company already depends upon it. In sum, the GitHub contributor counts should be much higher, and not merely for those in the business of selling software (or tech, generally). Any company defined by software—and that's your company, too—needs to get more involved in both using and contributing open source software. Read more

LibreELEC Embedded Linux OS Now Compatible with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

The LibreELEC 8.2.1 update is based on the latest Kodi 17.6 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software and it mostly patches some Samba (SMB) "file exists" share errors on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update by updating the protocol to Samba 4.6.10, implementing SMB client options for minimum SMB protocol and an SMB legacy security option with NTLMv1, and disabling SPNEGO. "LibreELEC 8.2.x includes changes that allow the Kodi SMB client and our embedded Samba server to support SMB2/3 connections; deprecating SMB1 to improve security and performance. This is necessary to cope with changes Microsoft introduced in the Windows 10 ‘Fall Creators Update’ to resolve SMB1 security issues," explained the developers. Read more

Canonical Releases Major Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 to Fix 13 Security Flaws

The update is a major one patching a total of 13 security flaws, including race conditions in Linux kernel's ALSA subsystem, the packet fanout implementation, and the key management subsystem, as well as use-after-free vulnerabilities in both the USB serial console driver and the ALSA subsystem. Various other issues were also patched for Linux kernel's key management subsystem, the Ultra Wide Band driver, the ALSA subsystem, the USB unattached storage driver, and the USB subsystem, which received the most attention in this update as several security flaws were recently disclosed. Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD