Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Games watchdog warns over content

Filed under
Gaming

Games publishers in the US have been told by the industry's watchdog that they must declare any hidden content in games released since September 2004.

Games publishers in the US have been told by the industry's watchdog that they must declare any hidden content in games released since September 2004.

It follows the uproar over secret sex scenes in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas which were unlocked by a fan.

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) has warned publishers that any hidden material should reflect the games rating.

Publishers failing to disclose content face "punitive action", it said.

The content in GTA: San Andreas was revealed by code created by a fan and had not previously been declared by its publisher Take Two.

The tighter rules were distributed by e-mail to US publishers and developers but a copy was leaked to games website Gamasutra.

"Fully disclosing hidden content accessible as Easter eggs and via cheat codes has always been part of ESRB's explicitly stated requirements when submitting games to be rated," said the US watchdog.

"If you fail to notify us of previously undisclosed, non-playable, pertinent content by January 9, and such content becomes playable through a subsequent authorized or unauthorized release of code to unlock it, rendering the original rating assignment inaccurate, punitive in addition to corrective actions may result."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Leftovers: Software

  • Ocs-server 0.1 Technology Preview released! (with cats!)
    Finally, after many iterations, we have something that works! The ocs-server team (Claudio Desideri and Francesco Wofford) is therefore announcing the first release of ocs-server 0.1 technology preview.
  • 5 Less known Linux Admin Tools
  • dmMediaConverter Review - Converting Videos Has Never Been Easier
    dmMediaConverter is described by its developer as an FFmpeg frontend (GUI), but regular users only need to know that it's an application that allows them to quickly convert files from one format to another, in a simple and intuitive way. It's not the best looking out there, but it gets the job done.
  • Goggles Music Manager 1.0.7 Adds Support for Ratings and Tags to Filters, More
    On July 30, the developers of the Goggles Music Manager software, an open-source music collection manager and player that supports some of the most popular audio file formats, announced the release of version 1.0.7.
  • Semi-Official Google Drive Support For Linux Arrives, What's Next?
    Three years ago, when a user would attempt to download the Google Drive Sync Client, Google would bring them to the appropriate download page, which of course, is based off of the operating system that user is running on. If a user would attempt to download the Google Drive Sync Client while running on Linux, they’d land on a page where the message reads: “Not (yet) supported for Linux.” So, what’s the deal with Google not developing a sync client for Linux users, seeing as to how they build a lot of their things using Linux? There’s one simple answer to that, unfortunately. Windows is mainstream, so a lot of their focus is put on what a majority of people use. The bigger the market, the more money in their pockets, of course. But don’t fear, change is near!

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming