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FreeBSD developer Kip Macy charged with tenant terror

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Prominent FreeBSD developer Kip Macy has been charged with waging a campaign of terror against people renting apartments in a six-unit building he owns. He stands accused of cutting out floor supports to retaliate against a tenant who went to court to keep from being evicted.

According to San Francisco prosecutors, Macy also shut off the tenant's electricity, disconnected his phone and had workers saw a hole in his living room floor. Other tenants claim the programmer-turned-landlord and his wife broke into their apartment and stole $2,000 worth of belongings. The couple was arrested Tuesday and charged with multiple felonies, including burglary, stalking, grand theft and shutting off service.

"This is a very bizarre case," Deputy City Attorney Jennifer Choi told the The San Francisco Chronicle. "It seemed like these landlords went from zero to extremely angry very quickly."

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Theo Number 2?

Maybe he can join Theo in OpenBSD. Both were seen misbehaving while at FreeBSD.

Wink

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