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What the Flock - the Social Browser Revolution

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At first, Flock appealed to me in a purely superficial way. As you may have noticed, I’m a sucker for style, good design and pretty textures, and Flock certainly unites all of these features.

Fortunately, that’s not all there is to tell. Flock is based on Mozilla Firefox and was first released in 2005. Back then it may have been a little bit ahead of its time since social web was only in its beginnings. Recently however, Flock has enjoyed very positive media coverage and its popularity virtually exploded in the beginning of this year, reaching close to three million downloads and increasing the number of active users by 135%.

As the name suggests, Flock is a community tool, rather than a ordinary browser. It comes with a lot of built in features, tailored to instantly connect you to your Web 2.0 addictions.

Personally, I’m not a member of each and every social community. I refuse to set up half a dozen profiles and indulge in fake popularity, if any. It’s simply not my thing. If you’re like me, you’ll probably not feel tempted to try Flock in the first place, but you may change your mind, just as I did.

So let’s look at it in a bit more detail.

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