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“Green” Open Source Technologies for Earth Day

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OSS

Today is EarthDay (visit the open source Drupal-powered website for details from the Earth Day Network). In September 1969, at a conference in Seattle, Washington, U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson announced that in the spring of 1970 there would be a nationwide grassroots demonstration on the environment. Senator Nelson first proposed the nationwide environmental protest to thrust the environment onto the national agenda. This would be the first Earth Day. Now the event is celebrated twice a year at different times depending on what hemisphere you are on.

In recognition of Earth Day here are a few open source ideas that might help save the planet or at least extend its shelf life.

* Recycle Desktop Computers into Thin Clients - Rather than buy a bunch of new computers that use environmental resources and add carbon to the atmosphere during the manufacturing process you could recycle aging desktop computers by creating a thin client setup. You could use the popular Linux Terminal Server Project to re-purpose those old computers into thin clients driven by a single server.

* Consolidate servers

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora Deciding Whether CD/DVD Installation Issues Should Still Hold Up Releases

Fedora will continue producing ISO images of their distribution that can be installed to a DVD (or CD in the case of some lightweight spins) or more commonly these days copied to USB flash drives, but they are debating whether any CD/DVD optical media issues should still be considered blocker bugs in 2020 and beyond. Fedora optical media and any issues pertaining to that would be considered non-blocking for Fedora releases. This reflects the fact a majority of Linux users these days are copying their Linux distributions to USB flash drives and installing from there rather than still burning CDs/DVDs. Particularly with many computers these days lacking CD/DVD drives, not having to worry about optical install issues as blocker bugs would free up resources to deal with more pressing bugs around release time. Read more

today's leftovers

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q4.4 Released With Navi 14 Fixes, DoW 3 Perf Optimization

    As anticipated, AMD has now formally released a new version of their AMDVLK open-source Vulkan driver following this week's Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Windows driver release. The changes end up being what I was alluding to yesterday with VK_EXT_pipeline_creation_feedback support, subgroup cluster support, a performance optimization for the Dawn of War 3 game, CTS failure fixes for Navi 14, and other fixes.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/50

    Another week has passed – and we’re almost at the end of the year. During the last week we have released 4 snapshots for Tumbleweed (1206, 1207, 1210 and 1211) containing those noteworthy changes: gpg 2.2.18 libvirt 5.10.0 linux-glibc-devel 5.4 Mozilla Thunderbird 68.3.0 bluez 5.52 libxml 2.9.10 createrepo_c 0.15.4: beware: it is very strict and blocks any snapshot if there is a package with non-UTF8 chars or ASCII < 32 (except 9, 10 and 13) in a changelog. Double check your .changes files before submitting. GNOME 3.34.2 KDE Plasma 5.17.4

  • Why you need to know about Seeed hardware devices

    The microcontroller craze doesn't seem to be dying down—and that's a good thing because these products consistently succeed where the mobile market consistently fails: Users get open software and hardware, a portable form factor, and a wide choice of vendors and products that are built to last. Among the best of the open hardware and software vendors is Seeed, the self-proclaimed "IoT Hardware Enabler." I recently started seeing the Seeed logo on projects, so I contacted the company to learn about the interesting things they're doing. In response, they generously sent me one of their latest products: the Seeeduino Nano, a compact board that the company says is fully compatible with the Arduino Nano but at half the price and a quarter the size, along with a sample sensor to get me started. I spent a few days with it, and I'm already working on a project to improve my home garden and thinking of several others for home automation. Far from just another Arduino-like product, the Seeeduino Nano solves several problems new makers face when they get a microcontroller and want to use it.

  • Marco Zehe: A quick introduction to using Gutenberg

    Late in November, I published a personal opinion on the state of Gutenberg accessibility. Today, I’d like to give an introduction to Gutenberg from a screen reader user perspective. Gutenberg, the WordPress block editor, is the new way to create content and build sites in WordPress. It is a rich web application that uses many modern techniques such as dynamic updates, toolbars, side bars and other items to completely update the posting experience. It can also be quite daunting at first. Let us try to shed a little light on some of the mysteries around it.

  • Pitfalls for OMEMO Implementations – Part 1: Inactive Devices

    Smack’s OMEMO implementation received a security audit a while ago (huge thanks to the Guardian Project for providing the funding!). Radically Open Security, a non-profit pentesting group from the Netherlands focused on free software and ethical hacking went through the code in great detail to check its correctness and to search for any vulnerabilities. In the end they made some findings, although I wouldn’t consider them catastrophically bad (full disclosure – its my code, so I might be biased :D). In this post I want to go over two of the finding and discuss, what went wrong and how the issue was fixed.

  • Support FSF's copyleft and licensing work

    We launched our annual fundraiser with the goal of welcoming 600 new associate members before December 31st. New members are critical to the cause, and by becoming a member you will stand in solidarity with others who care about computer user freedom. As is the case with any social movement, the numbers matter, and it is a very powerful gesture to make for only $10 a month ($5 if you are a student). Please support the work that gives hope for a future with software freedom: make a donation or – better yet -- join us and become a member today. The Free Software Foundation is a global leader for copyleft, and the licensing team plays a vital role in disseminating useful knowledge about free software while working to protect it. We accomplish this in part by answering licensing questions from the public and by providing resources like our list of free software licenses. We also increase access to software freedom by managing the Respects Your Freedom certification program, and cataloging free software through our endorsed distributions program and the Free Software Directory. To protect free software, we handle license compliance for the GNU Project, resulting in a stronger community and more respect for the power of copyleft. We are proud to accomplish this as just two staff working with our executive director, board, and legal counsel. These resources combined make a potent force for software freedom, and your support will ensure our work continues with the aim to do an even better job in 2020. Let us share a bit about the work we did in 2019 and elaborate on why it is so vital that this work continues.

  • OpenJS Foundation Welcomes Electron As Its New Incubating Project [Ed: OpenJS is run by people from Microsoft]

    Initially developed by GitHub in 2013, today the framework is maintained by a number of developers and organization

  • Twitter Is Funding Effort To Create A 'Decentralized Standard?'For Social Media

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Programming: GAction, Research on Developers, JavaBeans and Python

  • Sébastien Wilmet: Providing GActions in a library

    GAction represents an action that the user can do in an application, it’s usually present in a menu item or a button. It’s not just a function to launch, it’s a little more involved than that. Overall, providing GActions in a library can be done quite naturally, once the library provides a framework for the application. TeplApplication and TeplApplicationWindow both provide GActions in their public API. They are namespaced with the "tepl-" prefix, to avoid conflicts with other libraries or the application; so the full name of the GActions are "app.tepl-something" or "win.tepl-something". And all the GActions are documented in the class description. Note that TeplApplication and TeplApplicationWindow are not subclasses of GtkApplication and GtkApplicationWindow, because several libraries might want to extend those GTK classes and an application needs to be able to use all those extensions at the same time. A nice solution that doesn’t require to hold a new object in the application: use this design pattern that I’ve already described on my blog.

  • Research: Developers are trusted by the business but the alignment is not felt evenly across different generations

    Welcome to the first in a series of in-depth articles looking at the developer’s role in the modern organisation. In this first post: a new generation has arrived. As organisations shift to becoming technology-focused, developers’ roles have evolved so that they are now playing a crucial role in decision making across their businesses. However, all this newfound alignment isn’t so keenly felt across the whole developer workforce…

  • Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

    Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has many interesting and useful features, some of which I will be highlighting in this and upcoming articles. In this article, I’ll show you how to create an EJB timer programmatically and with annotation. Let’s go! The EJB timer feature allows us to schedule tasks to be executed according a calendar configuration. It is very useful because we can execute scheduled tasks using the power of Jakarta context. When we run tasks based on a timer, we need to answer some questions about concurrency, which node the task was scheduled on (in case of an application in a cluster), what is the action if the task does not execute, and others. When we use the EJB timer we can delegate many of these concerns to Jakarta context and care more about business logic. It is interesting, isn’t it?

  • Python Dictionary Comprehension

    In this tutorial, we will learn about Python dictionary comprehension and how to use it with the help of examples.

Mozilla and Curl Leftovers

  • Ending QA community events, for now

    QMO events have been around for several years now, with many loyal Mozilla contributors engaged in various types of manual testing activities– some centered around verification of bug fixes, others on trying out exciting new features or significant changes made to the browser’s core ones. The feedback we received through them, during the Nightly and Beta phases, helped us ship polished products with each iteration, and it’s something that we’re very grateful for. We also feel that we could do more with the Testday and Bugday events. Their format has remained unchanged since we introduced them and the lack of a fresh new take on these events is now more noticeable than ever, as the overall interest in them has been dialing down for the past couple of years. We think it’s time to take a step back, review things and think about new ways to engage the community going forward.

  • Tips to improve your Ring camera security

    We cannot stress this enough. Weak and reused passwords are a serious vulnerability to your personal security and privacy. The software that the Nulled crew is using to tap into Ring feeds can be used to take over other things like, say, a Disney+ account. Or your bank account.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Petitioning for rehearing in Mozilla v. FCC

    Today, Mozilla continues the fight to preserve net neutrality protection as a fundamental digital right. Alongside other petitioners in our FCC challenge, Mozilla, Etsy, INCOMPAS, Vimeo and the Ad Hoc Telecom Users Committee filed a petition for rehearing and rehearing en banc in response to the D.C. Circuit decision upholding the FCC’s 2018 Order, which repealed safeguards for net neutrality. Our petition asks the original panel of judges or alternatively the full complement of D.C. Circuit judges to reconsider the decision both because it conflicts with D.C. Circuit or Supreme Court precedent and because it involves questions of exceptional importance.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Reporting documentation bugs in curl got easier

    After I watched a talk by Marcus Olsson about docs as code (at foss-sthlm on December 12 2019), I got inspired to provide links on the curl web site to make it easier for users to report bugs on documentation. Starting today, there are two new links on the top right side of all libcurl API function call documentation pages. File a bug about this page – takes the user directly to a new issue in the github issue tracker with the title filled in with the name of the function call, and the label preset to ‘documentation’. All there’s left is for the user to actually provide a description of the problem and pressing submit (and yeah, a github account is also required).