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Reiser presents hard drives in court

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Reiser

Two hard drives that computer engineer Hans Reiser removed from one of his computers shortly after his estranged wife Nina disappeared on Sept. 3, 2006, were produced in court today by his attorney, William DuBois.

DuBois pulled the hard drives from a large envelope and gave them to Reiser to see if they fit into a computer that previously had been entered into evidence in his trial on charges that he murdered Nina, who had filed for divorce two years before she disappeared.

Reiser said they appeared to be the hard drives that he previously testified that he gave to DuBois shortly after Nina disappeared, probably on Sept. 7, 2006.
When he was cross-examined by prosecutor Paul Hora on March 20, Reiser said he removed the hard drives from his computer because he didn't want Oakland police to have access to them.

But he said that since he had revealed in court that DuBois had the hard drives, he expected they would be turned over to Hora soon. However, Hora on March 20 asked in a thundering voice, "What good are they now?"

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Also: Hans Reiser Proclaiming His Innocence During Ninth Day on Stand

Hans Reiser Trial: April 2, 2008

Selected 'Reiserisms' of Hans Reiser

"To get into a cleaning mood, when I start cleaning, I'm obsessive about it and I clean things too much."

"I'm sorry that might not be communicative. But somebody will understand."

"There was an intellectual limit to my procrastination."

"I was paranoid and this was on the same day that somebody was following me."

"The police were an expected problem."

"Do you want me to go back in the history that causes me grounds to be paranoid?"

"There are a whole bunch of things that have caused me to be progressively more, how do I say, hyper-vigilant."

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