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Arch Linux: Popular KISS distro

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Recently, we had a talk with the developer behind the young, but promising Linux-distribution, Draco Linux.

One of the big differences between Draco Linux and the user-friendly distributions we review here at, is the fact that Draco focuse on giving you full control over your operating system, without requiring you to have an advanced degree in Linux.

Draco Linux and similar distributions, are often referred to as KISS-distributions (Keep It Simple, Stupid!). One of the most popular KISS distributions to date is called Arch Linux which, compared to Draco, has a much larger community and number of developers.

To help us understand what make Arch Linux so great, we've asked the lead-developer - Aaron Griffin - some questions.

Could you briefly present Arch Linux in the same fashion?

ArchLinux is a distro which puts the user in control. It is a distribution designed to be a platform - a "base" for the user to do what they want. Other distros, for instance Ubuntu, tend to believe that the computer should manage itself and the user should just use it. This is a perfectly fine stance to take, and certainly works well for most people. But not for me. I want to have full control and that is why I use Arch.

Arch is lightweight and simple, like clay - able to be molded by the user as they choose. This means that we don't try to force a user's hand into our way of doing things, with our configuration tools, and our ideas. Developers suggest things, and push in certain directions, but let the user do as they wish.

Full Interview

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