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Obligatory Fav Distro Poll

Mandrakelinux
21% (569 votes)
Fedora
9% (238 votes)
Slackware
11% (291 votes)
PCLinuxOS
8% (218 votes)
Gentoo
14% (398 votes)
SUSE
10% (287 votes)
Debian
12% (321 votes)
Xandros
2% (66 votes)
FreeBSD
3% (80 votes)
other
10% (288 votes)
Total votes: 2756

Distro Shuffle

Well, I'm still going through the Distro Shuffle. Been using Linux for about 7 months or so now, after being on windows for a decade, and found the move relatively easy. However, I'm still searching for a good distro for me, I'll find one eventually. My first was Linspire...it hated me. It froze whenever I tried configuring PPPoE. Then it was Ubuntu...didn't like Gnome very much. Got Kubuntu, it was buggy, and the repository was lacking in software, and I hated compiling software from source (because you usually have to go and get each dependancy individually, and compile those first). Then tried Fedora Core 3, it was alright untill I realised that the reason none of the software I ever installed actually appeared on the Kmenu was because for some reason, it decided to put them all in the Gnome menus only. I never understood that...

I recently tried PCLinuxOS and it was working for a little while (I have it on my desktop and laptop) and it comes with all this really neat software that I wanted for my other systems but never managed to successfuly install...now all of a sudden neither my desktop or laptop will compile any source code at all, and both of them tend to see amaroK crash all the time, along with various other software. Now, when Mandriva 2006 comes out, I hope to try that one, or just do my own LFS system. I'll keep searching.

Xandros is Linux?

I thought Xandros was the bastard lust child of MS XP and OS X. so it really is a linux distro?...I'll be damned.

helios

re: Xandros

teehee. I thought about pulling it like suggested but it's too late in the game.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: gentoo :D

Hey, I thought I replied to this already! Musta lost it when I was mucking around in the database the the other day. I couldn't let a gentoo advocacy post go by. Smile

I agree. Gentoo is the perfect distro for the cli junkie or one who likes to diy. I fall into those categories. Smile I have to have a commandline alternative to most applications in case I bork my X again. Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: I started with Fedora Core 1

Yep, I think most linux users do the distro shuffle until they find one they really like and works good for their hardware. I tried several and I guess you could say I started with Mandrake. But that was when their gui config tools were little more than concepts. Thank goodness too, cuz I had to learn how to manipulate under the bonnet. I think I've about tried them all by now, the biggies anyway, and am quite happy with Gentoo these days.

Thanks for your response,
Susan

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: My "Other"

Yeah, that one's good too. Smile Thanks!

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: Fav Distro Poll : Other

oh cool, thanks. I was thinking of trying kubuntu. Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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