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TorrentFlux: A BitTorrent client on a server

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Software

TorrentFlux is a BitTorrent client that runs on top of a server running Apache, MySQL, and PHP. It extends the functionality of traditional clients by operating almost entirely through a Web browser interface. It uses the BitTornado client in the background to manage the queuing, downloading, and seeding of torrent files. You can run TorrentFlux on your home machine and access it through a folder on a Web server. You can also install it on an external host to increase bandwidth and transfer speeds.

BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer file sharing protocol that allows users to transfer large files without a central distributor. Users download files in small pieces from a variety of sources scattered across the Internet. BitTorrent is especially popular for the distribution of Linux CD and DVD images, which can range in size from 700GB to as large as 4GB for DVD images. BitTorrent relies on users 'seeding' their files after they finish downloading them -- that is, refraining from closing their client or deleting the data to allow other users to download portions of the file from them, which increases transfer rates across the board.

TorrentFlux is a persistent BitTorrent client -- that is, if your Apache service is active, TorrentFlux will be active as well.

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