Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

mozilla developer news March 18

Filed under

In this issue…

* Firefox 3 Memory usage
* Mozilla QA Companion released
* Mozilla at SXSW
* John Lilly and Mike Schroepfer interviewed by Matt Asay
* Effortless Good Firefox Add-on
* The Year of the Gecko
* Executive Director search update
* Last chance for free t-shirts!
* Firefox 3’s AwesomeBar changes for Beta 4
* Developer calendar
* Subscribe to the email newsletter

Firefox 3 Memory usage

As the web and web browsers have matured, people have started expecting different things from them. When Firefox was first released, few people were browsing with tabs or using large numbers of add-ons. As browser usage patterns have changed, so too have Mozilla’s strategies on how to effectively make use of system resources such as memory. A large number of changes have been made to the platform Firefox 3 is built on, including many that aim to reduce the browser’s memory footprint. The results have been dramatic, particularly in the recently released Firefox 3 Beta 4, with tests showing that Firefox 3 now beats memory usage numbers of all other modern web browsers.

Stuart Parmenter discusses Firefox 3’s memory usage in a post on his weblog. Several follow-up posts expand upon the discussion, including on weblogs by John Resig, Tristan Nitot, and Chris Blizzard. Ars Technica has also written an article about this topic.

More Here

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-7 Update Is Being Tested, on Track for October Launch
    The Ubuntu Touch OS is getting a new OTA very soon and the developers are putting the final touches on it. The update is still on track for an October 19 launch and it will remain that way if nothing goes wrong.
  • False Rumors About Microsoft Buying Canonical Are Ridiculous
    The rumor that Microsoft is interested in buying Canonical doesn't seem to go away, despite the fact that there is no real basis to it. We’ve already explained why that is unlikely to happen, but people still don't listen, so here are some more reasons why the rumor is perfect for April 1.
  • Is Microsoft Wooing Canonical & Important Departures…
    A while back I was fitted for a tinfoil hat by some because I had the audacity — the audacity! — to suggest that it would be a shrewd business move by the now-Linux-loving Microsoft to buy Canonical because a.) Canonical had technology that Microsoft would want and need to advance in mobile (like the Ubuntu Phone technology, which blows Microsoft’s out of the water currently), and b.) by this time, Mark Shuttleworth is beyond tired of flushing millions after millions down the toilet (though, as a half-billionaire, he still has several decades of current spending before his bank account resembles, well, mine), and who can blame him? You laughed. Well, sports fans, allow me to hand back your tinfoil hat and ask, who’s laughing now? Linux Journal’s James Darvell outlines this scenario in great detail, quoting a blog item reporting the business deal, and makes an observation worth keeping an eye on: “Microsoft could convert Canonical into a very profitable acquisition by eliminating the unprofitable parts of the company,” he writes. “In fact, it could become the dominant player in the cloud space, and secure the company’s future.”
  • Spice Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 15.04
    A Spice vulnerability has been found and repaired in the Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS operating systems. The SPICE protocol client and server library has been patched in the past few months a couple of times, and this is just the latest fix. It's not a major component, but users should really close any kind of exploit and vulnerability and upgrade their systems frequently.

Security Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Using open source principles to build better engineering teams

We become better software developers by observing how some of the best software in the world is being written. Open source has changed and will continue to change the way the world builds software, not only by creating high-quality reusable components, but by giving us a model for how to produce better software. Open source gives us complete transparency into that process. Read more