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Revvin' Up Your Linux Box! (Cooking with Linux)

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Linux

Nothing says high performance like a good race. Got Linux? Got a good accelerated video card as well? Then get yourself these great racing games, get behind the wheel, and drive!

Ah, welcome, everyone, to Restaurant Chez Marcel, where fine Linux fare is served with the most excellent wines from one of the world's premier wine cellars.

As you know, mes amis, the current issue's them is high performance, which we all know can only refer to racing and automobiles. If the words, high performance, and Linux don't immediately generate the same association in your mind, you should know that in point of fact, Linux and car racing go very well together. The 2007 Indianapolis 500 featured the first ever Linux-sponsored car. The brainchild of Ken Starks, aka helios, the Tux500 project succeeded in its aim to raise enough money to place Tux, the familiar Linux mascot created by Larry Ewing, on the hood of an Indy car.

In honor of this momentous event, the first race game on tonight's menu, SuperTuxKart, features the very same, Tux, at the wheel. SuperTuxKart, maintained by Joerg Henrichs, is an updated and enhanced version of the original TuxKart, created by Steve Baker. If you've played the original, you'll be impressed by the new, hugely improved, SuperTuxKart. The game features slick new graphics, new tracks, cool characters, racing adventures, and more. You take the controls as one of several characters including Tux, his friend, Penny, Mr. Ice Block, Sushi the Octopus (see Figure 2), Yeti, and others. You can get SuperTuxKart from supertuxkart.berlios.de.

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