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What if... Windows went open source?

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Microsoft

When Microsoft talks about open source, people in the FOSS community tend to generally take it with a pinch - or more likely a kilo - of salt. Revealing the crown jewels of its empire - the Windows source code - has never ever been canvassed.

But, given all the pressure that Microsoft is under these days from different quarters, what if the company decided to reveal those jewels? Would it have any impact on FOSS? Would people in the FOSS sphere really care? Would it make a difference?

Microsoft's own people don't think much of the idea; general manager Bill Hilf was recently quoted as saying that open sourcing Windows was more hassle than it was worth and the company saw little to gain from releasing code.

But what do people on the other side of the industry think?

More Here




Also: Windows 7 eyed by antitrust regulators

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