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Wal-Mart Yanks Linux PC From Shelves, Keeps Them Online

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Linux

After only a few months on the shelves, the plug has been pulled on the Linux experiment at Wal-Mart stores.

Wal-Mart had been selling Everex's gPC for $199 since November, but decided to scrap the offering in its stores. The retailer will continue to sell the PC at its online store. "It looks like this particular product serves our online customer space best and that's where we'll continue sales of Everex," Wal-Mart spokeswoman Melissa O'Brien said in an interview.

Wal-Mart.com sells nine different Everex models, including two Linux laptops and the gPC's successor gPC2, which is a Linux desktop like the gPC. The Linux models range from $199 to $399. They all run gOS, a Linux distribution created by Good OS that comes bundled with icons to launch a number of Google (NSDQ: GOOG)-run and other online services. A company spokesman told InformationWeek last year that the gPC had been a "top performer" online.

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Please Note: Wal-Mart is STILL SELLING Linux

Gotta love tech bloggers and so called 'journalists'. There is alot of buzz in tech media this week related to an AP report that claims that Wal-Mart is dropping the Everex Linux PC's.

Reality is that just as you could last week, you can go to Wal-Mart.com (and here I'll make it easy for you and even give you the link: http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=8304655) and buy the Everex gPC today.

As a regular Wal-Mart customer myself, I can tell you that if there is something 'neat' and not necessarily mainstream that I'm looking for, I'll generally go to Wal-Mart.com first and then order it from there (generally ship to store and then pick it up). Sure Wal-Mart no longer offers ship to store for the Everex gPC and they don't have it in stock either on their shelves but that's all part of the Wal-Mart model.

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