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Why I am Making the Switch from Gentoo to Kubuntu

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Gentoo

Anyone who knows me personally knows that I am an advocate of Gentoo. Linux ricer? Sure, why not, I live for those minute speed advantages. I also, perhaps masochistically, prefer building every package from source, and compiling kernels built just for my machine. Portage, when I first started using Gentoo, seemed like a good package management system. I was familiar with FreeBSD's ports system, and this was similar, so it was a smooth transition. The way Gentoo and portage functioned as a whole allowed me to keep a minimalist linux install, while providing all the tools I needed for whatever task.

Why, then, am I dumping Gentoo, and for kubuntu of all distros? In a few short words: Portage, lack of direction, outdated support, and a few other issues that are not as signifigant that I will mention below.

Portage

Ah yes, Portage. The almost essential tool to pull in dependancies, update packages, and for all around maintenance of your box. In theory. Portage is a joke in functioning properly. Without citeing specific sources, and speaking from my own personal experience, these are the most common issues I've had with Portage:

More Here




Also:

After long time using Gentoo distribution (since June 2004) , I decided to try another distribution. I think one of the reasons I'm lefting Gentoo may be because I'm getting older and I'm not getting fun anymore of tweaking it.

So, after some time trying to find another distribution, I decided to try Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10) Wow!! It is working perfectly! Just the way I wanted and it is super fast! Awesome!

Bye Gentoo... Welcome Ubuntu

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