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Music piracy unit raids ISP in BitTorrent assault

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Legal

Australia's music industry piracy investigations unit has raided an Internet service provider in Perth in what it says is the first Australian assault on the use of BitTorrent technology for copyright infringement.

"We have identified Swiftel as an ISP which has adopted BitTorrent technology to link infringers to music clips and sound recordings," Music Industry Piracy Investigations general manager, Michael Speck, commented in a statement released this afternoon. "We believe hundreds of thousands of downloads have been conducted in the last year in breach of copyright laws"."

Speck told ZDNet Australia the unit's investigations revealed that the Torrent Web servers hosted a "database of music video files which can be very quickly downloaded," provided the user has BitTorrent software or software or a protocol equivalent to BitTorrent.

Speck said its investigations ranged from the inspection of the Web site's features to company searches and the surveillance of sites in Western Australia and New South Wales which the MIPI suspected housed computers used in the operation of the Swiftel sites.

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