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Vista SP1: Still lagging behind the Linux desktop

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Microsoft

I had really thought that Vista SP1 would be an improvement. I didn't think it would be a big improvement, but still that it would be more competitive with Windows XP and the modern Linux desktop. I was wrong.

I've now been working with Vista SP1, the so-called RTM (release to manufacturing) version, for about two weeks. I am amazed at how little improvement I see in this so-called major update.

Last year, I took a long, hard look at Vista versus desktop Linux, testing SimplyMEPIS 6, in a four-part series. In the months since then, we've learned that Microsoft lied about how much hardware was needed to run Vista in an affair that we're now calling Vistagate.

Personally, I didn't need to see Microsoft/Intel e-mails to know that "Vista Capable" PC requirements were so much BS. I found that doubling Microsoft's minimum daily PC requirements would get you to the point of a bearable Vista experience. Not a good one, mind you, just one that wouldn't have you pulling out your hair.

SP1 was supposed to make this better.

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