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If Canonical bought PCLinuxOS…

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

Today I managed to help a friend in getting his iPod to work with Amarok in PCLinuxOS using this guide. We were successful and he’s happily using Amarok to manage his music as well as his iPod. At the end of all I was left satisfied and suddenly something really random hit me. It just hit me, seriously. What if PCLinuxOS was taken over by Canonical? Now I assume you are ready to skip the rest of the post and start flaming me already. Go on, but what good would it do? What is the fool talking about you’d say, wouldn’t you?

PCLinuxOS is an excellent distribution. What has proved to be the difference in making it my recommended distro for newbies or users coming from other operating systems is the fact that it runs fine on laptops as well. I’ve tried openSUSE, Mandriva and Kubuntu on my friend’s laptop and openSUSE worked but was overwhelming, Mandriva worked but it wasn’t as up to date as I’d have liked it, but more importantly both distros had slow package management. Kubuntu didn’t detect the sound and wi-fi for some reason from what I was told.

Now, PCLinuxOS depends a lot on donations but still manages to do a fantastic job with its wonderful developer team of Texstar and the Ripper Gang. I have had the opportunity to speak to devnet, one of the lead developers, once on IRC and they are indeed a very friendly community. Texstar has stated in the past that he has tried Debian and other distros before but ultimately decided to use Mandriva as a base. While that in my opinion has proved to be great, I want to try and analyze what would happen if Canonical backed this distro.

The first step would be attempting to work under the banner of Ubuntu.

More Here




Huh??

Isn't this idea a little similar to the 'bright' idea of Microsoft buying Linux? It's a community, not a company for all I know...

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