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Book review: Fedora Linux Toolbox

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Christopher Negus is responsible for some of the most widely-read and well-respected mass-market books on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. You may already know of, or own, Linux Toys, its sequel Linux Toys II, or one of his miraculously up-to-the-minute Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Bible books.

Negus has an uncanny ability to keep up with the rapid pace of development in the innovative Fedora distribution that, among other functions, serves as an upstream source for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, One Laptop Per Child, and other notable projects. If you’ve ever attended a Red Hat Summit or a Fedora Users and Developers Conference (FUDCon), you’ll undoubtedly find him circulating through the many interesting leading-edge seminars, picking up information for the next edition of the popular Bible series.

Recently, Negus teamed up with author François Caen to produce Fedora Linux Toolbox, which gives eager command-line enthusiasts a dense but easy reference for powerful shell tools. At about 300 pages, it also won’t bust the seams of your already overloaded computer bag. Fedora Linux Toolbox assumes the reader already has some experience with Linux in general, but not necessarily Fedora. Linux novices may prefer to start with a more thorough book, such as Negus’ Bible, or the latest edition of one of the others reviewed in this 2005 article, that spends time acquainting them with additional beginner topics.

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