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How Linux Users Should React in a Windows World

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Linux

Many Linux users find themselves working in Windows-based environments. More often that not, this is not something that can be avoided, and to be honest, I cannot actually say for certain that it should be. Despite the resistance from some Linux users to remain familiar with other operating systems, there is a certain level of importance in making sure that Windows does remain something that you are familiar with. And I say this for a number of reasons. Today, I will examine the advantages on all fronts as to being fluent with more than one OS.

Extending Your User Base: Software. It is just as foolish to only create and support applications on a single platform. This includes Linux-only apps. Like those who only support OS X or Windows, it would be silly to offer great applications like POPFile or Pidgin for Linux users, only then to exclude those who might prefer to use a different platform. Doing so is elitist and the developer is doing a real disservice to countless potential users. This is something that talented developers living in the Linux world must consider.

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More drivel from Matt Hartley

He begins by saying that Linux users should stay familiar with Windows. Instead of expanding on that, he applies the same admonition to developers and repair techs.
Ho-hum.

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