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PCLinuxOS Repositories now include SAGE Math

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Software

PCLinuxOS now includes SAGE Math in its download repositories. What is SAGE Math? It's an open source effort to replace expensive commercial closed-source mathematics software with open source alternatives. William Stein, the Mathematics Professor at the University of Washington who started the SAGE Math project says:

"SAGE is a project at University of Washington whose goal is to create an optimal free open source software environment for research and experimentation in algebra, geometry, number theory, cryptography, and related areas. I started SAGE in 2005 by combining together the very best of existing free software (e.g., Singular, PARI, GAP, Macaulay2, Maxima, gfan, etc), creating interfaces to non-free software (e.g., MAGMA, Maple, Mathematica), and beginning to fill in the gaps with new code. Now dozens of developers have joined me in working on filling these gaps and making SAGE a polished and high quality piece of free software."

SAGE Math won't be included in the CD ISO for PCLinuxOS as its core code is a 501MB download, and there are other associated libraries to download as well. But, it is available now in the PCLOS repositories. PCLOS users can install it using the Synaptic GUI program, or using apt-get install sage from the command line.

While SAGE Math is intended for Mathematical, Scientific, and Engineering use, I applaud PCLinuxOS for including this important open source software in its repositories.

SAGE Math is cross platform, and exists in versions for Linux, Mac OS X, and MS Windows.

SAGE Math home page: http://www.sagemath.org/.
Video Demo of SAGE Math: http://norfolk.cs.washington.edu/htbin-post/unrestricted/colloq/details.cgi?id=574.
Try SAGE Math online: https://www.sagenb.org/.
SAGE Math Wiki: http://www.sagemath.org:9001/.

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