Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Livecds against D.T.C.R.F.C.

Filed under
Linux

In the past we could divide Linux distributions in two main categories, the livecds and the installable ones, nowadays we have a third category, the D.T.C.R.F.C. or 'Distributions That Can Run From Cds'.

The main characteristic of the livecds is the possibility to run your system without install it. In fact, all DTCRFCs are able to run without previous installation and it confuses users around the world, even the most experienced. For those I would like to input the second main characteristic of the livecds: the power of costumization.

The livecds not only must run from any external devices, but also have to let the user rebuild them without lose precious time, need useless efforts or start bark at the moon, and the DTCRFCs do not provide the second characteristic because they are installable system built to act like a livecd.

The DTCRFCs I tested run incredible slowly, spend almost five minutes to boot, do not have a single application to rebuild the ISO on the fly, start useless services and love when we install them to the harddisk. They do not share the spirit of the livecd family members.

There are some livecds, important ones, without the power of costumization necessary to become user friendly, but at least they are livecds, they are distant cousins of the really good livecds, allthough some of them are becoming DTCRFCs.

In my personal opinion a livecd most provide a Modular System. Slax and Morphix provide different flavors of modular system that can be used to build a livecd. A single file with more than 650 MB including everything of the livecd does not help anyone. A livecd ISO must be easily edited.

If you intend to test and install a distribution, you can use DTCRFCs, if you intend to have a livecd, do not download some of these famous DTCRFCs around the world, get a REAL livecd, run it, rebuild it, remove and add modules, save settings, play around, make your own personal livecd, own modules and study the power of costumization.

More in Tux Machines

U.S. government releases open source gamification software

The United States' National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency has made some of its internally-developed gamification software available for free on GitHub under the MIT free software license. Developers may find it useful as a tool for configuring a server to track "gamification" systems like points or badges against user accounts on apps or websites; at the very least, it offers interesting insight into how the NGA is using game design tenets in its training programs. Read more

Let's Pay for Open Source with a Closed-Source Software Levy

This column has often explored ways in which some of the key ideas underlying free software and open source are being applied in other fields. But that equivalence can flow in both directions: developments in fields outside the digital world may well have useful lessons for computing. A case in point is a fascinating post by James Love, Director of Knowledge Ecology International (KEI), a non-governmental organisation concerned with public health and other important issues. It is called "The value of an open source dividend", and is a discussion of the problems the world of pharma faces because of the distorting effect of patents - problems it shares with the world of computing... Read more

Features Of The Linux 3.18 Kernel

With Linux 3.18-rc1 arriving one week early I didn't have a chance to write a feature overview of Linux 3.18 prior to this first development release that marked the close of the merge window. For those that didn't stay up to date with our dozens of Linux 3.18 kernel articles about changes and new features, here's a concise overview. Read more

Norway closes its open source resource centre

The government of Norway will no longer fund its open source resource centre, Friprog. Activities are wound down and the centre will be closed at the end of the year, Friprog reports. The GoOpen conference, planned for last September but postponed to May 2015, is now cancelled. Read more