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Review: DesktopBSD 1.6

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DesktopBSD, a derivative of Freebsd designed for desktop use, has come a long way since its early inception back in late 2005. Originally created as a way to bring the power of Freebsd as a desktop OS to new users, it has now blossomed into a desktop experience even the most hardened geek, or greenest novice can love.

One of the first and most noticeable changes in version 1.6 is that it now contains a LiveCD option. While I wouldn't consider this to be a typical livecd, it certainly stacks up well against the large collection of other livecd's out there. Initially you're greeted with the standard Freebsd boot screen and bootup sequence. The first part of the livecd session starts out with a semi-graphical welcome screen that is keyboard driven. After hitting return, you're taken into a graphical setup screen. If the setup can't detect your monitor's settings automatically, you may have an additional screen you have to click through here. That's not a big thing, as you just hit enter to continue. After this is done, you're asked a few questions about where you live so that DesktopBSD can properly tailor itself to your specific language and keyboard needs.

Upon loading the desktop, you're greeted with a fairly snappy, yet light weight desktop.

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