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Lucasfilm Partners With HP For Special-Effects Technology

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Sci/Tech

Lucasfilm Ltd., which created the blockbuster "Star Wars" film franchise, said Wednesday it will partner with Hewlett-Packard Co. for three years and use the company's software to design film and video game effects.

Lucasfilm - which houses Industrial Light and Magic, one of the film industry's best known special effects teams - will use HP technology to create visual effects, video games and animation.
HP, based in Palo Alto, said the partnership was worth millions but would not disclose exact terms.

"With this agreement, we will continue expanding the quality of our entertainment offerings and meet the constantly rising expectations of consumers when it comes to movies and video games," Cliff Plumer, Lucasfilm's chief technology officer, said in a statement.

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