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Early 2008 Fav Distro

2% (128 votes)
5% (266 votes)
7% (381 votes)
4% (216 votes)
4% (223 votes)
7% (373 votes)
27% (1463 votes)
3% (141 votes)
9% (511 votes)
27% (1470 votes)
6% (344 votes)
Total votes: 5516

OpenGEU or gOS

OpenGEU because it's based on e17 and gOS because it gives us a really great entry-level OS for web-centric users. I have adopted gOS as my installation choice for those users who really only want to click their way to various aspects of the web.

Klikit is home for me, the distro by friends, for friends

I use several distros and like many things about several, but Klikit is my home. I joined for the community and then fell in love with the software. Later...cos

Source Code

The important points here about providing source are:

Source code under the GPL must be made available.

So what Chris_medico_2001 was pointing out is:

1.) Apt sources for Klikit-Linux are available from the Klikit repositories or if requested via email, will be provided by an alternate method.
2.) Klikit-Linux has all of its proprietary applications created with bash scripting or are built with dialog, Xdialog, Kdialog and/or kommander.

These are all done via scripting.
Any file created with scripting programs is an editable file that is NOT compiled.
They are scripts you can open and alter at any time, therefore the scripts themselves ARE the source.


If you want to edit one of the Kommander applets, you can open it in Kommander, and you can alter it at any time. There's no source file to compile, because it is NOT a compiled applet. It is a script.

Klikit is good, Fedora too,

Klikit is good, Fedora too, and so is Dreamlinux.

Favorite 2008 Distro:

Without a doubt, my favorite is Klikit. It is well worth a look, especially for it's feature set unlike any other and its forum.



klikit does have some interesting ideas....

But I have to vote for debian!!!

Klikit-Linux is something special

I couldn't agree with you more...
The community gets to interact directly with the Klikit team and its developers.
And the community is so warm and friendly. I could characterize it as a caring and supportive place where everyone counts.

But... Is it GNU?

No, it's not. They don't ship the sources (to the in-house utilities, that is: you can get most of the sources via apt-get source... Wait, does it even have apt?) with it, and you can't get it on their mirrors. So it's a GPL violation. Nice try.

What are you talking about?

What are you talking about? ... ALL of the in-house utilities included with Klikit-Linux are GPL, and they are available to everybody. The utilities by them self are the source because they are based on bash scripting or are built with dialog, Xdialog, Kdialog and/or kommander. If you have the program you already have the source. None of our in-house utilities are offered as binary packages (*.deb) so you will not find them under apt. I know all this because I'm the main developer behind Klikit-Linux. It would be much better that before you write these kind of statements you do some research.

I am talking about...

You need to either upload the full sources or provide a written offer to get them. The article explains it better than I can.

Again, as I stated above,

Again, as I stated above, You should research more before doing any kind of statement.
In the very front page of our web site ( it clearly states:

"Most of the packages we use to build Klikit-Linux are under the GPL (GNU General Public License). If you want to access their source code you can use the apt-get source command. If you can't find what you're looking for, please write to source AT klikit-linux DOT com and we will provide you with the source."

Have you really loaded and tried any of the in-house utilities? All of them clearly say that they are developed with a GPL2 license, and that the source is available for those interested.

Are you REALLY interested in getting the source?, if so just send me a e-mail, and I'll make it available to you.


-- Vector, Wolvix, Zenwalk, SLAX... are they counting as Slackware?!
-- CentOS/Scientific/StartCom... uh?!

DreamLinux? Elive? MEPIS

DreamLinux? Elive? MEPIS gets its own option, and it's mostly Debian (as of 7.0)... But still, maybe whoever made that should have used categories instead of distributions, otherwise, it would be nigh-impossible to fit them all on there. DistroWatch has is 557, and it's obviously more than that.

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