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Mandriva and Turbolinux Announce Manbo-Labs

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Linux

Mandriva and Turbolinux announce a partnership by creating a lab named: Manbo-Labs. This Lab is the result of an agreement between Mandriva and Turbolinux to share resources and technology to release a common base system on each of the Linux distributions.

Mandriva, the leading European editor of Linux distributions, and Turbolinux, a leading Linux client and server distributor in Japan and China, signed the agreement about Manbo-Labs last October and have been working together since then. Both companies decided to wait until first internal delivery to issue this announcement.

Manbo-Labs' team is composed of more than ten developers from France, Japan, Brazil and also includes developers from the community. Altogether, they have been working on building a common Linux base system to be released in April 2008. Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring will be based on this system.

The current internal delivery is composed of: gcc; glibc; rpm; kernel; bin-utils; mkinitrd; udev.

By this Agreement, Mandriva and Turbolinux form a strategic partnership to pursue on Linux solutions to address new customers. By pooling together common engineering resources, Mandriva and Turbolinux will be able to invest more in technology and product quality. For instance this will help in getting more hardware compatibility and stronger relationships with ISVs and IHVs.

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I'm getting worried about this...

Here's what PJ wrote:

[PJ: I guess this is goodbye then, for me, as far as Mandriva goes. I’ve used it for years and really loved it, and I thank them for helping me get to use Linux. But TurboLinux signed a patent deal with Microsoft, joined Ecma to help out with MSOOXML, participates in the Interoperability Vendor Alliance, uses Windows Media and made Live Search the default. So you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know what all that means. Since Mandriva and Turbolinux are sharing code now, I don’t trust the code so it’s a fond farewell from me.]

Sad :-(

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