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KDE 4.0

KDE 4.0

My spare computer has Mandriva 2008 on it. Mandriva has published KDE 4.0 binaries, so I downloaded them and installed them.

The first 10 minutes, I hated it. As I played with it, and got a bit familiar with it, I liked it better and better.

Is is ready to go on your productivity machine?? Certainly not--it's too unstable (maybe partly Mandriva's fault because when installing the X86_64 binaries, I had a missing library error during install), and there's too much functionality missing.

Can I see the potential? Yes, I can. It truly is a structural foundation for great things to come.

But KDE 4.0 is largely a developer/enthusiast release--no less, no more.

Should the KDE developers have released it as "KDE 4.0", rather than as "4.0 RC3", or "4.0 developers release"? That's a different question. Maybe, maybe not.

But, it doesn't really matter. I don't forsee distro makers tossing aside KDE 3.5.x until KDE 4 is considerably more stable and complete.

KDE 4.x applications

Why not a fourth options
KDE applications + a non KDE window manager
used regularity

re: KDE 4.x applications

What applications? Big Grin

kdevelop k3b lyx or

kdevelop
k3b
lyx or kile
koffice
kaffeine

Same here

I'll switch when they do something to that kicker replacement. Very unusable right now, too much space wasted. And the blue KDE button doesn't look right on the black background, but that's just me. Plus I need real apps, not plasma...

I love KDE but...

I love KDE but I am not sure if I am going to be sold on 4.0 right now. I admit that despite being a big Linux fan, I haven't paid much attention to the KDE scheme of things lately, but the screenshots of KDE4 sure don't make me want to even figure out how to install it on my Gentoo system. I forget where I read it, but someone even noted that the taskbar couldn't even be customized. Is that true? I also read on some developers blog (I wish I recalled the URL) that KDE 4.0 shouldn't be considered KDE4, instead we should wait until certain bugs are fixed before calling it such.

That doesn't sound like much of an excuse, but rather it sounds like a rushed product. I am just hoping that KDE 3.5x will continue to be supported for some time, until 4.0 gets it's bugs and features sorted out.

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