Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE 4.0

KDE 4.0

My spare computer has Mandriva 2008 on it. Mandriva has published KDE 4.0 binaries, so I downloaded them and installed them.

The first 10 minutes, I hated it. As I played with it, and got a bit familiar with it, I liked it better and better.

Is is ready to go on your productivity machine?? Certainly not--it's too unstable (maybe partly Mandriva's fault because when installing the X86_64 binaries, I had a missing library error during install), and there's too much functionality missing.

Can I see the potential? Yes, I can. It truly is a structural foundation for great things to come.

But KDE 4.0 is largely a developer/enthusiast release--no less, no more.

Should the KDE developers have released it as "KDE 4.0", rather than as "4.0 RC3", or "4.0 developers release"? That's a different question. Maybe, maybe not.

But, it doesn't really matter. I don't forsee distro makers tossing aside KDE 3.5.x until KDE 4 is considerably more stable and complete.

KDE 4.x applications

Why not a fourth options
KDE applications + a non KDE window manager
used regularity

re: KDE 4.x applications

What applications? Big Grin

kdevelop k3b lyx or

kdevelop
k3b
lyx or kile
koffice
kaffeine

Same here

I'll switch when they do something to that kicker replacement. Very unusable right now, too much space wasted. And the blue KDE button doesn't look right on the black background, but that's just me. Plus I need real apps, not plasma...

I love KDE but...

I love KDE but I am not sure if I am going to be sold on 4.0 right now. I admit that despite being a big Linux fan, I haven't paid much attention to the KDE scheme of things lately, but the screenshots of KDE4 sure don't make me want to even figure out how to install it on my Gentoo system. I forget where I read it, but someone even noted that the taskbar couldn't even be customized. Is that true? I also read on some developers blog (I wish I recalled the URL) that KDE 4.0 shouldn't be considered KDE4, instead we should wait until certain bugs are fixed before calling it such.

That doesn't sound like much of an excuse, but rather it sounds like a rushed product. I am just hoping that KDE 3.5x will continue to be supported for some time, until 4.0 gets it's bugs and features sorted out.

More in Tux Machines

Security: SEC Breach, DNSSEC, FinFisher, CCleaner and CIA

Android Leftovers

Red Hat: Patent 'Promise', Proprietary 'Gifts', Imminent Results, Fedora 27 Delays

  • Red Hat pledges patent protection for 99 per cent of FOSS-ware [Ed: And when Red Hat gets taken over (like Sun and Oracle) this promise will be worthless]
    Red Hat says it has amassed over 2,000 patents and won't enforce them if the technologies they describe are used in properly-licensed open source software. The company's made more or less the same offer since the year 2002, when it first made a “Patent Promise” in order to “to discourage patent aggression in free and open source software.” In 2002 the company didn't own many patents and claimed its non-enforcement promise covered per cent of open source software. The Promise was revised in order to reflect the company's growing patent trove and to spruce up the language it uses to make it more relevant. The revised promise “applies to all software meeting the free software or open source definitions of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) or the Open Source Initiative (OSI)”. That verbiage translates into any software licensed on terms the OSI approves on this list, or which meet the Initiative’s definition of open source offered here. Licenses listed by the Free Software Foundation as a free software license at https://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.html#SoftwareLicenses also come under the Promise's purview, as do those here as of the date this edition of Our Promise is published.
  • Red Hat Open Source Day rewards with proprietary hardware. For the fourth time
    The above is an excerpt of the 2017 event announcement. Which, as you can see below, will be at least the fourth consecutive one in which Red Hat Italia will award participants with some of the most proprietary devices around. Please note the absence of anything like, e.g. Matchstick, “100% Linux compatible laptop, with Linux preinstalled”, or a Fairphone, in the screenshots...
  • Red Hat (RHT) to Report Q2 Earnings: Will it Beat Estimates?
    We expect Red Hat Inc. RHT to beat expectations when it reports fiscal second-quarter 2018 results on Sep 25.
  • Needle Action Activity Spotted in Enbridge Inc (ENB) and Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fedora 27 Beta Hit By A Second Delay
    Last week it was decided to delay the Fedora 27 beta due to bugs while this week they've been forced to delay the release a second time. The first beta delay wasn't too bad as the F27 schedule already had a built-in "rain date", in acknowledging Fedora's frequent release delays. But today a second unplanned delay is pushing back F27 Beta by at least one more week. This will now also push back the Fedora 27 final release by at least one week.
  • Fedora 27 Beta status is NO-GO
  • News: The new Krita 3.3.0

Security: Apple's Betrayal, Intel ME Back Doors Backfire, and Optionsbleed

  • iOS 11 Muddies WiFi and Bluetooth Controls
    Turning WiFi and Bluetooth off is often viewed as a good security practice. Apple did not rationalize these changes in behavior.
  • How To Hack A Turned-Off Computer, Or Running Unsigned Code In Intel Management Engine
    Intel Management Engine is a proprietary technology that consists of a microcontroller integrated into the Platform Controller Hub (PCH) microchip with a set of built-in peripherals. The PCH carries almost all communication between the processor and external devices; therefore Intel ME has access to almost all data on the computer, and the ability to execute third-party code allows compromising the platform completely. Researchers have been long interested in such "God mode" capabilities, but recently we have seen a surge of interest in Intel ME. One of the reasons is the transition of this subsystem to a new hardware (x86) and software (modified MINIX as an operating system) architecture. The x86 platform allows researchers to bring to bear all the power of binary code analysis tools.
  • Optionsbleed: Don’t get your panties in a wad
    To be honest, this isn’t the first security concern you’ve run in to, and it isn’t the first security issue you’re vulnerable to, that will remain exploitable for quite some time, until after someone you rely on fixed the issue for you, meanwhile compromising your customers. [...] Is it a small part of the SSL public key? A small part of the web request response? A chunk of the path to the index.php? Or is it a chunk of the database password used? Nobody knows until you get enough data to analyse the results of all data. If you can’t appreciate the maths behind analysing multiple readings of 8 arbitrary bytes, choose another career. Not that I know what to do and how to do it, by the way.