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Distro Review: Vector Linux 5.9

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Linux

Another fresh distro for me this time in the shape of the Canadian offering Vector Linux. It's another lightweight Slackware based distro and often gets compared to Zenwalk and Wolvix. With Zenwalk fresh in my mind and Wolvix fresh on my hit list I spent a few days with Vector. Here's how I got on...

Installation:
At first I downloaded Vector 5.8 as it was the latest version according to the distribution website, I ran it for a day or so and got quite far into setting it up. Then I looked on Distrowatch and realized that 5.9 had already been released on 21st December, so it was back to the drawing board. I find it strange that Distrowatch could be more up to date than the actual distributions own website but there we go. I suppose the moral is always look on Distrowatch first.

At the second attempt I booted up the install CD to be greeted by the text based installer. It was obviously a modified version of the Slackware installer which I've come to know pretty well of late.

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