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One Laptop Per Geek - A Review in Many Parts

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OLPC

So I decided to try an experiment, and participated in the G1G1 (Give 1, Get 1) program from the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project.

My 4 year-old is the original target market for the purchase, and I know from experience as the computer geek in the family, (and most of the extended family - sigh), that I would be the primary fount of knowledge for the users of our OLPC. One of the sections of this review will be about how to find out more about the laptop and interface.

It Actually Arrived

The OLPC project emailed me about the 20th of December or so saying in effect that they wouldn’t be able to get the laptop to us in time for Christmas Eve, and included a link to a little card that you could print out to put in the child’s stocking so they wouldn’t be completely disappointed. An old hand at things like this, (can you say RSN? aka Real Soon Now?) I made sure the family knew it was on it’s way but by no means guaranteed to arrive before Christmas. It was a very pleasant surprise to have the UPS guy hand it to me at about 1620 on the 24th.

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