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SUSE Linux 10.0 Beta 2 Report

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The "Lizard Blizzard" continues as OpenSUSE released Beta 2 of the upcoming SUSE Linux a coupla days ago. So what's new in this release since the August 9th release of Beta 1?


Most of the changes appear to have taken place beneath the hood, updating software versions, squashing bugs, kernel patches and the like. But to the nekked eye, upon boot one notices the koffice icon on the desktop has been replaced by an OpenOffice.org icon. The late developemental version 1.9.123 of OOo is presently included with OpenSUSE. I've been running a pre-2.0 version of OOo for months on my gentoo install due to some bugs (or updated dependencies), and have found it to be very stable and much nicer looking. Novell lays claim to a "Novell Edition" on OpenSUSE. I didn't note anything special about it other than a nice start splash. If anyone knows, please feel free to respond.

Another addition to the desktop is a systray icon for Beagle. Clicking on that opens the Beagle search tool. I supposed that could be a handy feature. Speaking of the Beagle search utility, it now also has a systray icon in gnome as well. So, now Beagle opens each login not only in KDE but gnome as well. I'm sure this has got to be a bug, I hope so.

Also included is KAT. It's not installed by default, but I did note references to updating to version 0.6.2. I first became aware of this wonderful utility with the release of Mandriva's 2006 Beta 2. In subsequent communication with the author I found it to be much more comprehensive than Beagle and I hope OpenSUSE will consider using it as default as opposed to Beagle, especially if that feature of opening each and every login continues.

Oh man, speaking of logins, if one logs in, one must inevitably log back out. Another bug that reared it ugly head in Beta 2 is the total lock up of the system when logging out KDE, gnome, or icewm. This happens if you choose log out or reboot. How annoying. I had to hit reset 3 times in researching SUSE Linux for this article. Fortunately I chose the reiser filesystem and haven't lost data or my install yet.

Also new are many more modules in yast. Many deal with more options for networking and more hardware configurations. I thought I'd test out installing and configuring Zen. It made it through the extensive install, however, all of yast crashed and burnt when it was time to do the configuring and finish the install.

So, all in all, I found that Beta 2 introduced several new bugs and a few new features. An old friend at Mandrake once told me that sometimes the more bugs you squash, the more you make. ...Meaning that sometimes you fix one bug and it introduces two more. He said that's why sometimes you have to choose to release even though you know there are some bugs as they might be preferrable to the ones you make when you fix the first ones.

Some highlights in the 6 mb ChangeLog include:

  • ifolder3:

    • changed prefix to /usr/lib/ifolder3 [#104474]
  • installation-images:
    • fixed /etc permissions (#104715)
  • nmap:
    • Don't strip binaries
  • yast2
    • Lots of typo fixes, and bug fixes
  • OpenOffice_org:
    • fixed some potentially dangerous warnings

    • fixed to build portaudio with RPM_OPT_FLAGS
    • updated branding for 10.0 [#102355]
  • hotplug:
    • removed also desktop templates

    • removed all files except hotplug.functions and desktop templates
      package will be dropped completely in next beta
  • hwinfo:
    • added hdtv cards (#102933)

    • find input device udi (#102575)
    • fixed usb device udi matching (#102575)
    • read modules.alias, not modules.pcimap
    • updated X11 data
  • initial:
    • minor string format changes to ease the translators' work

    • updated po/{de,fr}.po
    • added po/{cs,hu,nb,pa,pt}.po
  • installation-images:
    • added sfdisk
  • kernel-source:
    • update to 2.6.13-rc6-git7

    • config.conf: Enable Xen build.
    • series.conf: Re-activated ntfs-subfs
  • Lots and lots of application version updates
  • Way too much to list here

I've carved down the changelog to only include since the last beta release and posted it here.

I've posted the License.txt here, as some expressed interest in it. Glancing over it, I'm not sure it's exactly the same one as in the installer, but this is the readable version on the install isos.

I've posted a complete list of rpms included as tested here if you wanted to check on the progress of your favorite app.

I've posted some screenshots of some of the new features here.

For a more complete report of the goodies in SUSE Linux by OpenSUSE, consult my previous report.

re: better experience

Oh wonderful! Good news. Thanks for your input. Smile

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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