Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE Linux 10.0 Beta 2 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The "Lizard Blizzard" continues as OpenSUSE released Beta 2 of the upcoming SUSE Linux a coupla days ago. So what's new in this release since the August 9th release of Beta 1?


Most of the changes appear to have taken place beneath the hood, updating software versions, squashing bugs, kernel patches and the like. But to the nekked eye, upon boot one notices the koffice icon on the desktop has been replaced by an OpenOffice.org icon. The late developemental version 1.9.123 of OOo is presently included with OpenSUSE. I've been running a pre-2.0 version of OOo for months on my gentoo install due to some bugs (or updated dependencies), and have found it to be very stable and much nicer looking. Novell lays claim to a "Novell Edition" on OpenSUSE. I didn't note anything special about it other than a nice start splash. If anyone knows, please feel free to respond.

Another addition to the desktop is a systray icon for Beagle. Clicking on that opens the Beagle search tool. I supposed that could be a handy feature. Speaking of the Beagle search utility, it now also has a systray icon in gnome as well. So, now Beagle opens each login not only in KDE but gnome as well. I'm sure this has got to be a bug, I hope so.

Also included is KAT. It's not installed by default, but I did note references to updating to version 0.6.2. I first became aware of this wonderful utility with the release of Mandriva's 2006 Beta 2. In subsequent communication with the author I found it to be much more comprehensive than Beagle and I hope OpenSUSE will consider using it as default as opposed to Beagle, especially if that feature of opening each and every login continues.

Oh man, speaking of logins, if one logs in, one must inevitably log back out. Another bug that reared it ugly head in Beta 2 is the total lock up of the system when logging out KDE, gnome, or icewm. This happens if you choose log out or reboot. How annoying. I had to hit reset 3 times in researching SUSE Linux for this article. Fortunately I chose the reiser filesystem and haven't lost data or my install yet.

Also new are many more modules in yast. Many deal with more options for networking and more hardware configurations. I thought I'd test out installing and configuring Zen. It made it through the extensive install, however, all of yast crashed and burnt when it was time to do the configuring and finish the install.

So, all in all, I found that Beta 2 introduced several new bugs and a few new features. An old friend at Mandrake once told me that sometimes the more bugs you squash, the more you make. ...Meaning that sometimes you fix one bug and it introduces two more. He said that's why sometimes you have to choose to release even though you know there are some bugs as they might be preferrable to the ones you make when you fix the first ones.

Some highlights in the 6 mb ChangeLog include:

  • ifolder3:

    • changed prefix to /usr/lib/ifolder3 [#104474]
  • installation-images:
    • fixed /etc permissions (#104715)
  • nmap:
    • Don't strip binaries
  • yast2
    • Lots of typo fixes, and bug fixes
  • OpenOffice_org:
    • fixed some potentially dangerous warnings

    • fixed to build portaudio with RPM_OPT_FLAGS
    • updated branding for 10.0 [#102355]
  • hotplug:
    • removed also desktop templates

    • removed all files except hotplug.functions and desktop templates
      package will be dropped completely in next beta
  • hwinfo:
    • added hdtv cards (#102933)

    • find input device udi (#102575)
    • fixed usb device udi matching (#102575)
    • read modules.alias, not modules.pcimap
    • updated X11 data
  • initial:
    • minor string format changes to ease the translators' work

    • updated po/{de,fr}.po
    • added po/{cs,hu,nb,pa,pt}.po
  • installation-images:
    • added sfdisk
  • kernel-source:
    • update to 2.6.13-rc6-git7

    • config.conf: Enable Xen build.
    • series.conf: Re-activated ntfs-subfs
  • Lots and lots of application version updates
  • Way too much to list here

I've carved down the changelog to only include since the last beta release and posted it here.

I've posted the License.txt here, as some expressed interest in it. Glancing over it, I'm not sure it's exactly the same one as in the installer, but this is the readable version on the install isos.

I've posted a complete list of rpms included as tested here if you wanted to check on the progress of your favorite app.

I've posted some screenshots of some of the new features here.

For a more complete report of the goodies in SUSE Linux by OpenSUSE, consult my previous report.

re: better experience

Oh wonderful! Good news. Thanks for your input. Smile

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Intel Ads as 'Articles'

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers