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Why I Won't be Recommending Linux to Family this Holiday Season

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Linux

For the Linux community, 2007 has been a fantastically successful year. Who would have thought that we’d see big name OEMs shipping machines with Linux pre-installed onto them, and people are actually buy those machines in the tens of thousands? Incredible.

But all this success isn’t enough for me to start recommending that family and friends abandon the Microsoft-imposed shackles and head off into a world of Linux freedom.

Most of Linux’s commercial success is down to one distro – Ubuntu. Ubuntu is, without a doubt, the easiest, most accessible, best set-up and nicest Linux distro currently available.

But despite all the success that Linux has enjoyed this year, I’m not yet ready to start recommending Linux to family and friends as a pathway to computing utopia. I’m certainly not ready to start recommending Linux to family over the holiday dinner table, because while a friend or acquaintance might forget that it was me that told them to switch to Linux, I don’t have the same wriggle room with a family member.

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Blah, blah, blah...

...All talk and no action.

If you're not happy about something, then do something about it. Opensource allows this. There's a reason why the source code is freely available. Wink

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