Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Mac User Tries Linux

Filed under
Linux

I recently talked my father into dumping his five year old Dell (it was running Me no less) and getting an iMac. Since he no longer needs it, it now sits beside my PowerMac on my desk at home. But I already have two Macs that handle my workload nicely and since I sure as hell won’t be running Windows (I have no desire to deal with the associated security nightmare that entails) that leaves me with one option, Linux.

The following is the first piece in a series of articles that detail my attempts at using Linux. As a long time Mac user I will be comparing the “Linux Experience” to the “Mac Experience” not to see which one is better (I have already made up my mind on that issue) but rather to find out what is involved in setting up Linux and using it effectively. So, for all of you Mac users out there who have thought about getting into Linux, this piece is for you.

Part 1: Choosing a Distro, Downloading, Burning

Part 2: Installation and Configuration

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

The Red Hat Way

  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot
    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc. Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.
  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27
    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.
  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata
    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

Games: Racing Games, Steam, SteamWorld Dig 2, XCOM 2: War of the Chosen

Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More