Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Minor grumbles with Mandriva 2008 and its GNOME 2.20

Filed under
MDV

I reinstalled Mandriva 2008 on my Acer TravelMate 5310 to check a few issues in comparison with a RHEL5 clone (X/OS 5.0) and with Fedora 8.

To my surprise, I discovered that under no distro can the correct writing speed of my LG DVD burner GSA-T20N be determined! Exactly as with the other distros I tried...

* You simply can't burn CDs with Nautilus, the speeds are something like "11.4x" and the burn fails.
* K3b, GnomeBaker, Brasero, Graveman are letting me choose whatever speed I want for burning a CD.
* For DVDs, they're also clueless, and if I choose "2x" the DVD is actually burned at 4x. The maximum speed of 8x also works.

So far, so good. For a first grumble, I noticed that the battery stopped charging, and that it says "97%". Then, by reading the details, I got the following dilemma: if the battery is only charged at 97% (43.3 Wh instead of 44.4 Wh), then how can it say the capacity is 100%?!

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

GNU/Linux Desktop Security

  • How to Safely and Securely Back Up Your Linux Workstation
    Even seasoned system administrators can overlook Linux workstation backups or do them in a haphazard, unsafe manner. At a minimum, you should set up encrypted workstation backups to external storage. But it’s also nice to use zero-knowledge backup tools for off-site/cloud backups for more peace of mind. Let’s explore each of these methods in more depth. You can also download the entire set of recommendations as a handy guide and checklist.
  • Google zero-trust security framework goes beyond passwords
    With a sprawling workforce, a wide range of devices running on multiple platforms, and a growing reliance on cloud infrastructure and applications, the idea of the corporate network as the castle and security defenses as walls and moats protecting the perimeter doesn’t really work anymore. Which is why, over the past year, Google has been talking about BeyondCorp, the zero-trust perimeter-less security framework it uses to secure access for its 61,000 employees and their devices.

Leftovers: Gaming