Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hans Reiser Trial: Day Five

Filed under
Reiser

The young son of Linux genius Hans Reiser concluded testifying Wednesday at the behest of prosecutors who accuse his father of murdering his mother. The boy's nearly two days on the stand did what the authorities had hoped:

Jurors purposely were left confused by an 8-year-old boy who is to provide the trial's only eyewitness testimony about the final moments before his mother vanished.

That's an important distinction as the trial meanders through its second week here in Alameda County Superior Court. The boy was called by prosecutors, and flown from Russia, in a bid to show jurors his memory can't be believed as far as Sept. 3, 2006 is concerned -- the day his mother disappeared after she dropped the boy and sister at their father's Oakland hills house.

The authorities are trying to sow seeds of doubt in jurors over the boy's credibility because in December, in a pretrial hearing before a jury was picked, the boy testified he saw his mother, Nina Reiser, leave the Oakland house.

Testimony by Reiser Son Does Job: Stirs Juror Confusion Over Mom's Disappearance




Also:

1:19 p.m.: The little boy is done testifying for the prosecution. He will be cross-examined tomorow by the defense during a morning session. After Thursday, the trial is dark all of next week because of a previously agreed-upon court schedule.

Outside court today, defense attorney William Du Bois didn't want to go into specifics about what he will ask the boy. But he acknowledged that it must have been "real tough" for the 8-year-old to be testifying in court with his father watching him. Du Bois said the boy seems to be faring well "under the circumstances, which are lousy."

Prosecutor Paul Hora declined to discuss the boy's testimony but said jurors could expect to hear next from Nina's mother, Irina Sharanova, after the defense is done cross-examining the boy. That could take place tomorrow, Hora said.

We now turn to legal analyst Steve Clark, who attended today's proceedings, to parse what we've heard so far from the boy.

Hans Reiser Trial: Day Five

More in Tux Machines

Another great experience in Fedora bug reporting: Wine font fix solves my web-browsing problem

Fedora‘s motto is “Freedom. Friends. Features. First.” I’m here to tell you Fedora lives up to that billing. Why do I say this now? I’ve just had another positive experience with Fedora, this time in finding a bug in my system, adding my information to an existing bug report and now seeing updated packages pushed to the Fedora 20 stable repositories and onto my system, where the problem has been fixed. Read more

GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program. Read more

The top 14 hidden features in Windows, iOS, and Android

You may think you're a high-tech power user who knows all the nooks and crannies of Windows, iOS, and Android, but let's be realistic: There could be at least a few undocumented (or poorly documented) commands, control panels, and apps that have slipped by you—maybe more than a few. We've dived deep into each OS to uncover the best hidden tips and tricks that can make you more productive—or make common tasks easier. Got a favorite undocumented tip to share with readers? Add them in the comments section at the end of the article. Read more

Android-on-ARM mini-PC draws less than 7W

The DSA2LS runs a pre-installed Android 4.2.2 (Jelly Bean) with integrated online or offline update functionality on a dual-core, 1GHz Freescale i.MX6 DualLite system-on-chip. The SoC has a Vivante GC880 GPU that’s not as powerful as the Vivante GC2000 GPU found on the Dual and Quad i.MX6 models, but it still plays back 1080p video and offers 3D graphics acceleration. The power-sipping DualLite enables the fanless computer to run at a modest 6.26W active and 1.42W standby, according to Shuttle’s AnTuTu benchmarks. Read more