Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian start-up seeks new funding

Filed under
Linux

Ian Murdock, chief strategy officer and a co-founder of both Debian and Progeny, said his company has been running profitably off its Series A funding round, completed in 2000, but now it's time for a more assertive phase at the company.

"We're looking to accelerate our growth," Murdock said in an interview here at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo. "It's nice not to have to worry about raising more money to keep the lights on, but it's frustrating; there are always more opportunities than you have the resources to tackle."

The investment round likely will close by the end of 2005 or early 2006. It's actually the second time it tried for a Series B round, but the first, during the technology bubble burst of 2001, was a "bad time," Murdock said.

Debian, run largely by volunteers, has long been a noncommercial alternative to top Linux versions from Red Hat and Novell's Suse. Progeny is trying to make a business by customizing Debian Linux for particular devices such as telecommunications gear, storage systems or special-purpose dedicated servers. In these devices, Linux is typically embedded but not visible to outside users.

Competitors include the general-purpose Linux companies as well as embedded computing specialists such as Wind River and MontaVista Software.

Progeny is one of several companies involved in the Debian Common Core (DCC) Alliance, an effort to try to bring more weight to the Linux version. For example, software and hardware companies wanting to certify that their products work with Debian now will have fewer partners to worry about, Murdock said.

"We're stronger together than individually," he said. The DCC Alliance hopes to make a version of Debian that's compatible with version 3.0 of the Linux Standard Base. Other alliance members are Knoppix, Xandros, Linspire, Mepis, Credativ, GnuLinEx, Sun Wah and User Linux.

Such alliances have been tried in the past, however. UnitedLinux fell by the wayside after one of its members, the SCO Group, chose to attack Linux rather than boost it. Its members, plus Progeny, gathered again in 2004 to form the Linux Core Consortium.

The DCC Alliance will fare better, Murdock predicted. For one thing, the alliance members all share the same core technology--Debian 3.1, called Sarge. For another, they have diverse, non-overlapping business models despite a similar technology foundation.

By Stephen Shankland
CNET News.com

Interesting

Yes, they said with funding they anticipate going from one new release every 3-4 years to nearly twice that many in the same time frame. Funny how Debian Developer's still think that the folk tale about the tortoise and the hare is true.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

The Linux Test Project has been released for September 2015

Good news everyone, the Linux Test Project test suite stable release for *September 2015* has been released. Since the last release 272 patches by 27 authors were merged. Notable changes are: * Network namespace testcases were rewritten from scratch * New user namespaces testcases * New testcases for various virtual network interfaces * New umount2() testcases (for UMOUNT_NOFOLLOW, MNT_EXPIRE and MNT_DETACH flags) * New open() testcase (for O_PATH flag) * New getrandom() testcases * New inotify, cpuset, futex_wake() and recvmsg() regression tests + The usual number of fixes and enhancements Read more

Smart touchscreen dev kit runs Android on quad-core i.MX6

Gateworks announced a 7-inch touchscreen Android development kit, with a quad-core i.MX6 SoC, GbE, WiFi, BT, GPS, USB, serial I/O, and dual mini-PCIe slots. The Gateworks “GW11036″ Embedded Android Development Kit is aimed at easing the process of developing smart touchscreen-interfaced systems for use in a wide range of applications, including those requiring extended temperature operation. The kit builds on the company’s GW5224 single board computer, adding a 7-inch, 1024 x 600-pixel TFT display, capacitive touchscreen, wireless modules, and a customized, microSD-bootable, Android KitKat operating system. Read more

13 Ways You Can Help Desktop Linux To Grow

This is the condition when there are over 300 Linux distributions with a number of them being desktop focused. Linux was (and still) considered to be the “geek only” zone with the biggest misconception that one need to know the command line to use Linux. Times have changed. Linux is a lot more user-friendly than what it used to be in late 90’s or early 2000. The chances for Linux to gain market share is now and you definitely could help in this cause. Read more

Today and Yesterday in Techrights