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a review of Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 7.10, codenamed Gutsy Gibbon, emerged from the jungles last month and has been beating its chest ever since. Touted as the easiest-to-use desktop Linux distro yet, 7.10 hopes to bring the power of Linux to the masses.

Linux has traditionally been used by software developers and hardcore tech enthusiasts, of course, but the operating system is increasingly being adopted by a more mainstream audience. Ubuntu is already the most popular desktop Linux distribution because it offers impressive ease of use, and it's quickly approaching feature parity with other platforms (it also offers a few unique advantages of its own).

Ars tested Ubuntu 7.10 and its new features extensively on several different computers, including the Dell Inspiron 1420n that we recently reviewed with Ubuntu 7.04. The verdict: it's impressive. How impressive? Read on for our take on installation and new features like the graphics configuration tool and Ubuntu's Firefox improvements.

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