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My distro is redder than yours, so ner!

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Seems to me that any company becoming successful and having some sort of influence is a massive target for mindless ravings and rantings about how the said company is destroying the world. Of course I am referring to the latest series of rants and raves about Ubuntu, giving it a right good kicking. At the end of the day, does it matter? Fanboy this, fanboy that, mine's bigger than yours... my brother is bigger than your brother and my dad can have your dad with one hand tied behind his back, in fact my dad’s granny can have your dad in a fight... please, for the sake of all that is pointless and meaningless, give it up. So one person prefers cola A to your favourite, sun shining out of the proverbial kernel arse distro cola brand B. What the hell does it matter? I don't use Linux because it is an operating system; I use it for the things it allows me to run, the very same things that will work on almost every other distro (platform accepted). You may as well be arguing over which is a better flavour, cheese and onion or salt n' vinegar... of course, that has to be Cheese and Onion every time. A crisp is a crisp (chips if you are on the other side of the puddle, or anywhere but the UK come to think of it. Damn, is the whole world wrong and the UK the last bastion of crisp correctness!). It comes from the same thing, a potato. Fried, baked, boiled or mashed, a potato is a potato is a spud.

Isn't it about time people turned their attention to the applications they can run on their potato? After all, what is a distro? A collection of applications nicely assembled? A different pair of curtains in the same living room? Ah, but applications run 3 nanoseconds faster on my distro. Please, leave it alone, I'm far too busy with life to worry about such things, I've not been a 13yo, spotty computer oik since Adam was a boy and a personal computer was the size of my house (does anyone else remember those unbelievably high capacity 10MB hard disks? You know, the ones the size of a house brick?). Anyway, it was a long time ago in beer glass not far far away, I graduated to alcohol and girls leaving such pre-pubescent time wasting in the very distant past. 3 Marriages and 2 business' later I really don't care if it comes in shiny diarrhoea brown or golden shower yellow. If I don't like the look of it I can change it and if I don't like the flavour I can add some salt and pepper and a whole load of chilli sauce. All I want, all I need is something to run my programs on and from what I can gather that would mean pretty much any of them. What would a distro be with nothing to run on it? An operating system? Hmmm, what can I do with that then? And there is enough up there already if you were thinking of answering that.

So, now that my rant is over, now that my lunch has been spilled all over my keyboard and the manager is giving me the evils regarding the machine gun like noise emanating from my old keyboard, tell me why. Tell me why the choice of a distro is important? Tell me why I should prefer salt n vinegar to cheese and onion? Vindaloo to madras? Whiskey to whisky? Tell me why and why I should frankly give a damn, dear?

Ah, the edit, I actually remembered what I was going to write when I started this before I had an itchy case of tangentitis... remember when, way back in the 80's/early 90's the big blue was seen as the all controlling, monopolistic bad boys and Microsoft was the new kid on the block, kicking sand into those big blue eyes? Everyone loved Microsoft. Then the tide turned. As I stated in the beginning, any company that grows large enough to have influence is always a target for a good bashing. People like to be seen carrying the torch of righteousness for no particular or long lost purpose. All aboard the band wagon everyone, we have a new cause to defend and another witch to burn. And before the flames are spewed forthwith, I am not condoning the Ms business practices, merely stating a fact by observation.

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You mean you weren't talking about Ubuntu?

You don't use Linux because it's an operating system?

That's like saying I don't drive a Toyota because it's a car. But I do. "Because it's a car." is reason number one.

Don't mind me; I'm just busting your balls. And I don't really own a car.

Mine is faster coz it's red

Actually, the analogy about the car should have been... you don't drive an engine, you drive a car... you can't do much with an engine on it's own except look at it, polish it and get it to make some noise... but then I'm just picking Wink and the good thing about driving is that you need a license to say you can drive, pity the same isn't applied to computers, t'would save a lot of my time being spent on pointless, mindless, soul sapping support Smile

I don't drive a Toyota, not because it's a car but because I find them a bit crap. I'll have to admit though, 3rd class riding is better than 1st class walking Smile

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